Hi! I'm Heidi.

 Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

 I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Preserve Eggs & TWO Methods for Freezing Eggs (Plus, a Discussion of Other Methods That Work to Preserve Eggs)

How to Preserve Eggs & TWO Methods for Freezing Eggs (Plus, a Discussion of Other Methods That Work to Preserve Eggs)

It's November...and yet, we still have eggs galore! There is just no way Mr. V. and I are managing to eat all these yummy eggs, between having fifteen laying hens, two duck mamas, and one turkey hen who also just started laying! Chicken eggs, duck eggs, and turkey eggs!

Because of the blessing of all these eggs, I have been experimenting with how to preserve eggs. What is the best way? I've tried dehydrating eggs, freezing eggs (two ways), pickling eggs, and I think for the things I've tried, I have an answer to the question: Which way is best to preserve fresh eggs?

 Because of the blessing of all these eggs, I have been experimenting with how to preserve eggs. What is the best way? I've tried dehydrating eggs, freezing eggs (two ways), pickling eggs, and I think for the things I've tried, I have an answer to the question: Which way is best to preserve fresh eggs?

Because of the blessing of all these eggs, I have been experimenting with how to preserve eggs. What is the best way? I've tried dehydrating eggs, freezing eggs (two ways), pickling eggs, and I think for the things I've tried, I have an answer to the question: Which way is best to preserve fresh eggs?

Note: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article. If you click through and make any kind of purchase, I'll receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you for helping keep Healing Harvest Homestead online--Heidi

How to Preserve Eggs, Plus TWO Ways to Freeze Eggs Successfully

There are more than three ways to preserve eggs in addition to dehydrating them, freezing them, and pickling them. But, I'll be honest...I'm not interested in storing eggs in sand or salt in our cold room, and I'm not interested in any other method that sounds complicated. Because...I'm a simple person, ya'll. I like quick and easy. So here is what I've discovered about preserving eggs:

Dehydrating Eggs:

I'll start here. First off, I'm just going to say: DON'T. DO. THIS. Not unless you can take a really crummy egg experience. 

Here's what I did, and maybe I did something wrong, here---and if you know more about dehydrating eggs than I do, I'd love to know your experiences! First of all, I beat up six eggs at a time and spread them on parchment paper on my dehydrator trays. I use the Excalibur nine-tray dehydrator, and honestly, I love it. It's the BEST dehydrator I've ever used and works super well for yogurt, fruits, vegetables & herbs. "So, why not eggs?" I thought.

 Here are six eggs poured onto parchment paper on my  dehydrator  trays. I tried 4 trays for a total of two dozen eggs.

Here are six eggs poured onto parchment paper on my dehydrator trays. I tried 4 trays for a total of two dozen eggs.

But...even though it did a fabulous job of dehydrating my eggs, the end result was less than auspicious. The eggs, when dehydrated, have a kind of greasy feel to them (obviously, it's due to the high fat content of the egg yolk), and they crunch up easily, kind of like an egg cracker. I stored them all in a pint Mason jar (24 eggs!) by crunching them up into small pieces.

I was advised to put them in a grinder to make into an actual powder, but I couldn't bear to do that to my grinder. I've also heard they leave a terrible residue, and that's not good for either of the grinders I have. One is for herbs and one is for coffee. I don't need egg residue in either, thank you.

 Look at this! I got two dozen eggs packed into a pint Mason jar. Unreal. We're not using these any time soon, but they're here if we are desperate.

Look at this! I got two dozen eggs packed into a pint Mason jar. Unreal. We're not using these any time soon, but they're here if we are desperate.

And...they taste bad and have an awful texture. Not a good egg experience. I'm sure, for survival purposes, they might be a good option to store away for Armageddon, but I'm not interested in this, prepper that I am. 

That's my brief experience with dehydrating eggs and my personal opinion. You can try it if you want! I'd love to know if yours come out any better!

My final verdict on dehydrating eggs: "Just, EW." 

Freezing Eggs (Two Ways):

THIS is my favorite way of preserving eggs. Now, since we have a freezer, this is a great way to preserve our eggs. If we were living more primitively, then freezing eggs would not be an option. Since it is for us, though, I am freezing away!

Method 1 to Freeze Eggs:

I decided that six eggs all at once is a great way to start. So, I beat up six eggs, added 1/2 teaspoon of salt (I've heard that makes them better somehow, and I figured it couldn't hurt), and poured them into quart size freezer bags.

 Freezing eggs like this is easy to label, easy to freeze, and easy to eat! Pretty awesome! 

Freezing eggs like this is easy to label, easy to freeze, and easy to eat! Pretty awesome! 

(Now, forgive me for using plastic, but sometimes it must be done. I'm pretty anti-plastic, and you can read about that here, along with how to make beeswax reusable cling wrap from cloth.

I like freezing the eggs this way because they practically lay flat, and I can stack a lot in the freezer very easily. 

To use them, just defrost and cook as normal! NICE! 

 Look how flay they lay!

Look how flay they lay!

Method 2 to Freeze Eggs:

I got this idea from my friend, Anna, over at Salt in My Coffee. She's more meticulous and mathematical than I am, so her method has more precision than mine...but still. The overall result is the same, I'm sure. You can read about her egg freezing experience using this method here.

For this method, you don't beat the eggs--you freeze them whole! How cool?! I decided I just had to give this a try. I simply used a Wilton silicon mold set I have for making soaps. Perfect! Plus, I thought it was kind of cute the eggs come out in the shape of a heart--not precise, I know, but very sweet.

 Here they are: One egg per opening, and by using a  silicone mold,  you can just pop them out easily when they're done! 

Here they are: One egg per opening, and by using a silicone mold, you can just pop them out easily when they're done! 

Just break an egg into each mold opening, carefully place it in your freezer, and there you go! Pop them out when they are completely frozen. I just put mine in quart size freezer bags in groups of six again. I should be able to take as many out at a time as I want, but if not, then six is just fine. 

Freezing eggs this way is a little bulkier to store in your freezer, but you do preserve the integrity of the whole egg. 

 Here they are! Nicely packed into a quart freezer bag, ready to go back in the freezer for later! 

Here they are! Nicely packed into a quart freezer bag, ready to go back in the freezer for later! 

Pickling Eggs:

I love pickled eggs! I'm not going to go into details on this method because I wrote a whole article about pickling eggs, along with my two favorite recipes using herbs. Click the link if you'd like to read about that and find out how that goes (it goes GREAT, by the way).  

I will just say that pickling eggs requires you to keep them in a jar in the fridge, and that takes up SPACE. So, if you have a lot of space in your refrigerator, this could be a great method for you. We eat these so fast, it doesn't really matter for us, though.

You can also pressure can pickled eggs, but that is a realm I haven't tried out yet. I'll let you know when and if I do! I need a pressure canner first! That's on my wish list for someday. 

How to Use Preserved Eggs:

How to Use Dehydrated Eggs:

You'll need to rehydrate them, then cook them as normal. However, I promise you they will be horrible. The best way to use dehydrated eggs, I understand (I've never actually tried it), is to bake with them after you rehydrate them. Use equal parts water and egg powder.

How to Use Frozen Eggs:

Method 1, Beaten, in Freezer Bags:  

Just defrost and use like normal. You can make scrambled eggs, or you can cook with them! Since I put the quantity on the bags, too, (because homegrown eggs are not all the same size, which is natural and normal) I can measure out the amount I want. For example, if I only want to use 3 eggs, I'll cut the quantity in half and measure out that amount. 

Method 2, Frozen Whole:

To eat: defrost (the yolk takes the longest) and use as you normally would! You can also use them in baking or cooking too.

How to Use Pickled Eggs:

Oh, Mama! Just enjoy the heck out of these! Go ahead and eat them! SO, SO good! But if you wanted to, you could make one delicious egg salad with these. The tartness of the vinegar in the egg makes a great complement to the salad. Yum! Here is that article again on How to Make Pickled Eggs (Plus My Two Favorite Recipes).  

Final Thoughts about Preserving Eggs

If you love eggs and you have a lot of them, you should absolutely consider preserving them in a way that works for you! I personally recommend freezing (number 1) and pickling (number 2) as my personal favorite best options. Even if you don't have chickens, you can purchase fresh eggs from a local chicken owner and make sure you always have enough eggs on hand for baking and eating. 

You might also enjoy these articles:

Do you preserve your eggs? What is your favorite way? And if you have a better plan for dehydrating eggs (or freezing or pickling), I'd love to know! Leave a comment and share with us!

Hugs, Health, & Self-Reliance,

Heidi

P.S. If you haven't done so yet, I hope you'll sign up for our newsletter to get tips not found on the blog as well as updates and FREE eBooks (essential oils for one and using herbs for the other). It comes out weekly, on Wednesdays. I don't spam, but once in awhile if a time sensitive opportunity comes along, I'll share those too. So, go ahead and sign up! 

 Another great course from  The Traditional Cooking School ! 

Another great course from The Traditional Cooking School

 Now I'm off to go eat these!

Now I'm off to go eat these!

 Summer is here, and chickens are laying like crazy! What to do with all those extra eggs? Besides using them in recipes, you might want to consider preserving them. Here are the best ways to preserve your extra eggs, along with directions for each method. You'll want to find out how to store your extra eggs for the long term! #preserveeggs #howtopreserveeggs #freezeeggs #dehydrateeggs #pickleeggs 

Summer is here, and chickens are laying like crazy! What to do with all those extra eggs? Besides using them in recipes, you might want to consider preserving them. Here are the best ways to preserve your extra eggs, along with directions for each method. You'll want to find out how to store your extra eggs for the long term! #preserveeggs #howtopreserveeggs #freezeeggs #dehydrateeggs #pickleeggs 

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