Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

Cellulite Scrubbing Hot Process Soap Recipe with Rosemary, Grapefruit & Cedarwood

Cellulite Scrubbing Hot Process Soap Recipe with Rosemary, Grapefruit & Cedarwood

Cellulite is just something that most women can't avoid---it's part of being a woman! Even if you are thin, you can have cellulite.  There is more general information about cellulite in this article.  Even though it's such a common problem for women, there are ways to manage it, feel great at the same time, and keep yourself healthy in the process.  One of these ways is to use soap with cellulite-fighting ingredients!  Yep---the recipe for this hot process soap is filled with ingredients that help tone the skin, increase circulation, and provide an exfoliation benefit. 

If you are not familiar with making hot process soap, you can visit this link and this link for very detailed picture tutorials.  All of the steps are provided here, but for really complete steps and pictures, those two articles are extremely well-laid out! 

Almost every woman has cellulite---even very thin ones!  But even though it's common and part of being a woman, nobody really likes dealing with it, right?  This soap contains ingredients that reduce the appearance of cellulite, exfoliate, and smells WONDERFUL!  Find out how to create your own hot process soap for reducing cellulite! 

Almost every woman has cellulite---even very thin ones!  But even though it's common and part of being a woman, nobody really likes dealing with it, right?  This soap contains ingredients that reduce the appearance of cellulite, exfoliate, and smells WONDERFUL!  Find out how to create your own hot process soap for reducing cellulite! 

 

About the Active Ingredients in this Soap:

Rosemary essential oil increases circulation to your skin, so this helps break down fat pockets! It is also an excellent oil to help unblock lymph blockages, and this will also help with cellulite reduction. A nice addition is that rosemary is great for your brain, helping with alertness and concentration!

Grapefruit has many health benefits.  One of the main ways Grapefruit Essential Oil helps to reduce cellulite is that it helps remove toxins from the body and reduce fat cells.  Grapefruit essential oil is high in vitamin C, which also helps fight weight gain.

Cedarwood helps with fluid retention and is also a great oil for improving lymphatic drainage.  

Patchouli's scent may actually help reduce food cravings.  It also helps with fluid retention.   

Finely ground (unused) fresh coffee particles are added to this soap to help with circulation to the skin and fat cells.  In addition, the caffeine in the coffee helps to firm and tone the skin. 

Lemon Essential Oil is also great for added Vitamin C!  It's also added because of its lovely and refreshing scent. 

French Pink Clay is added to give the soap an excellent slip, a beautiful light pinkish brown color, and it's great for your skin!

You can probably guess already that this soap smells fabulous besides having some very effective ingredients!

Ingredients for Cellulite Soap

Water/Lye Solution:

15 ounces distilled water

7.2 ounces sodium hydroxide (food grade)

Luxury Moisturizing Oils:

15 ounces organic olive oil (I get mine at Costco--it's the least expensive organic EVOO I've found)

15 ounces coconut oil

12 ounces sweet almond oil

6 ounces shea butter

Additions for Color and Function:

1 tablespoon ground coffee

1 ounce Rosemary essential oil

1 ounce Grapefruit essential oil

1/2 ounce Cedarwood essential oil

1/2 ounce Patchouli essential oil

1 tablespoon French Pink Clay

Sources for Supplies

Most of my bulk oils I purchase through Starwest Botanicals, except for Olive Oil (Costco).  I also use Amazon.  The links in this article are a combination of my favorite places to purchase supplies.  I also use Bulk Apothecary for some of the essential oils and bulk oils I use in soaps. 

There is absolutely a difference in the quality of essential oils.  For soap making I honestly don't worry too much about this---I just want a good quality oil that will not kill my wallet since I do use quite a bit in my soaps.  However, if you want the highest grade essential oil possible, I recommend doTerra oils.  These are what I use for direct application (but that's another article).

Learn everything you need to know to make your own natural soap the way YOU want it! Hot process method is emphasized in my new eBook!

Learn everything you need to know to make your own natural soap the way YOU want it! Hot process method is emphasized in my new eBook!

Tools You Will Need to Make Hot Process Soap:

1)  A good kitchen scale

2) A large crock pot--the simpler, the better

3) Wooden spoons

4) A hand blender

5) safety goggles

6) safety gloves

7) heat-proof containers for pouring your lye solution

8) silicone soap mold (for a three pound loaf)

9) sharp knife, or a soap cutter

 

Directions for Making Hot Process Cellulite Soap:

1)  First, get your oils (not the essential oils and additives---just the main bulk oils) melting in your crock pot.  I always do this first because some of the oils are often solid (shea and coconut oil).  Measure out the oils into the crock pot and set to LOW. 

2)  WEAR YOUR SAFETY EQUIPMENT (SAFETY EYE WEAR, GLOVES, LONG SLEEVE SHIRT) before working with your lye and water solution! 

Next, ready your lye solution.  ALWAYS measure out using a good kitchen scale for exact measurements.  The other ALWAYS is to only pour the lye beadlets into the water---never the other way around.  If you pour water onto lye, you could get a chemical mini-explosion that could hurt you.  Set the lye solution aside while your oils are melting. 

3) Once your oils are melted, gently pour the lye solution into the oil in the crock pot.  Add your clay now. 

4)  Get your hand blender and mix to trace.  This will look like pudding once you reach this stage.  You should be able to leave peaks in the mixture.

It's just barely starting to cook, here, but you can see what "trace" looks like! 

It's just barely starting to cook, here, but you can see what "trace" looks like! 

5) Put the lid on the crock pot and let "cook."  You will see the mixture go through a few different stages.  When it starts rising up the side of the crock pot, just STIR, stir, stir it really well.  It will subside down.  You may have to give your soap a couple of good stirs. 

This picture shows the semi-cooked soap.  The saponification process (where the sodium hydroxide turns the oils into actual soap) is happening, but there are still very opaque areas.  If these are still in the mixture, then it's caustic! 

This picture shows the semi-cooked soap.  The saponification process (where the sodium hydroxide turns the oils into actual soap) is happening, but there are still very opaque areas.  If these are still in the mixture, then it's caustic! 

6) When you notice the mixture has gelled (looks translucent, kind of like vaseline), then it's ready!  I always do the "ZAP" test--although some people don't think that's a good idea.  I have never had a problem burning myself, even when I have messed up on the soap batch.  Basically, you take a small blob, and if it feels waxy, just place it on the tip of your tongue.  If you don't get "zapped" then it's a GO!  

The "zap" test---I've tried using pH testing, but honestly, for me, this is seriously the best way to make sure your hot process soap is ready to go and no longer caustic. 

The "zap" test---I've tried using pH testing, but honestly, for me, this is seriously the best way to make sure your hot process soap is ready to go and no longer caustic. 

This is a great soap making resource! 

This is a great soap making resource! 

 

7) Use a spoon and pour or ladle into your soap mold.  Pack it down good, and you will get a much smoother, nicer loaf.  

8) After about an hour or two, I like to cut off the top by sliding a sharp knife along the top of the mold.  This creates a beautiful, smooth finish that many mistake for cold process. 

Soaps cooling down in the molds.

Soaps cooling down in the molds.

 

9) Allow to stay in the mold over night.  

10) When it's completely cooled down, remove it from the mold.  This is the fun part!  You get to use it now!  Cut it as you wish---If you want to leave it in block form, that's fine!  You can cut it into bars any time you want. 

Beautiful, great-smelling, effective bars of soap! 

Beautiful, great-smelling, effective bars of soap! 

Have you ever made hot process soap?  There's kind of a chasm between those who prefer making cold-process to hot process.  What's your opinion?

Hugs & Self-Reliance!

Heidi

P.S.  In case you haven't had a chance, sign up for the HHH Newsletter and never miss a thing!  It's over in the sidebar, and you will receive my FREE eBook on using herbs to relax when you sign up!

 

Affiliate Disclosure:  This article contains affiliate links, and this just means that if you click through and make a purchase, I will make a small commission at no cost to you!  I really appreciate your support of Healing Harvest Homestead! Heidi

Disclaimer:  I am not a medical doctor, and any statements made in this post or elsewhere on my website is for information purposes only and are simply my own opinion based on experience and study.  Please be sure to see a medical professional for any health concerns you may have! 

This article has been shared to these great link ups! Visit for more great simple life and homestead tips:  Homestead Blog Hop, Grandma's DIY, The Homesteader Hop, Our Simple Homestead Hop, Simple Saturdays, and The Homestead Bloggers Network!

 

 

Beet Kvass: What, How, & Why?

Beet Kvass: What, How, & Why?

How to Make Delicious Fermented Jalapeño Pepper Rings

How to Make Delicious Fermented Jalapeño Pepper Rings

0