Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Infuse Herbs in Oils for Salves, Soaps & Remedies

How to Infuse Herbs in Oils for Salves, Soaps & Remedies

If you want to make herbal salves, you need to infuse your herbs in oil first! Herb infused oils are great to use for soap making, salves, body oils, and butters! Plus, they look pretty cool on your shelves.  I always get asked, "What is that?" with fingers pointing toward my herbal infusions.  I love to explain, and people are always impressed with them!  Here is how to make some great infused herbal oils.  

Here is a blend of St. John's Wort, Calendula, Plantain, & Comfrey.  I will be using this to make a powerful healing salve in about 6 weeks, when this oil is completely infused.  These herbs are suspended in the oil right now, but will settle.  Isn't it beautiful?

Here is a blend of St. John's Wort, Calendula, Plantain, & Comfrey.  I will be using this to make a powerful healing salve in about 6 weeks, when this oil is completely infused.  These herbs are suspended in the oil right now, but will settle.  Isn't it beautiful?

These are some of my herbs infusing in oils.  Aren't they pretty?  I use these to make different salves, butters, and even in my soap making.  I also sometimes add essential oils to them when they are finished for super skin softening combinations.  More to come!  

These are some of my herbs infusing in oils.  Aren't they pretty?  I use these to make different salves, butters, and even in my soap making.  I also sometimes add essential oils to them when they are finished for super skin softening combinations.  More to come!  

What You Need to Make Herb Infused Oils

You'll need your herbs!  

If you are not sure what herbs to use for what, you can check out some great herbal resources...or shoot me an email or comment below!  For now, here are a few links to books I use a LOT and highly recommend:  Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs, Dina Falconi's Earthly Bodies & Heavenly Hair, and Organic Body Care Recipes by Stephanie Tourles.  All of these have ideas for which herbs to use for what.  

For herbs I don't grow or wild craft myself, I purchase my herbs almost exclusively from Starwest Botanicals because of the excellent quality and fast shipping.  

**Be sure to use DRIED herbs in your oil.  If there is any moisture present, you stand the chance of mold forming, and this can get really stinky! 

Oils for Infusing Herbs for Salves & DIY Body Care Products 

You can use all kinds of oils for infusing herbs to make salves, body oils and butters.  Here are my favorites:

Sweet Almond Oil:  

Almond oil is lighter than olive oil, and very emollient.  This means it soaks into the skin very quickly.  If you are making a body oil for massage, this is the oil I recommend. Almond Oil has some really wonderful properties that help soften and smooth the skin.   

Organic Olive Oil:

Olive Oil is one of the most healthy oils you can put on your skin.  I won't get into the science and chemistry because you can look that up yourself, but it's just great for your outsides as much as your insides.  I prefer olive oil for making salves.  I don't use it much for body oils because it's rather thick and doesn't soak right into your skin like lighter oils do.  (I always buy my EVOO at Costco because I have not found a better price.  I always buy organic.)

Grapeseed Oil:  

If you are dealing with oily skin, then you might want to give Grapeseed oil a try!  It's good for your skin, but it doesn't cause extra oiliness.  It's even lighter than almond oil and absorbs very quickly. 

The above are my personal favorites, but feel free to experiment!  (Some people like to infuse coconut oil, but I choose to be careful with it---some people are allergic to it---like me.)  

 I generally purchase my oils and butters (other than EVOO--I get organic from Costco) from Bulk Apothecary.  I haven't found better prices anywhere for the amount you need.    

How to Infuse Your Herbs in Oil:

Method One (My Favorite): 

Solar Infusion: 

1.  Pour your dried herb (single or blend) into a large glass jar.

 I use these types of jars, depending on how much oil I plan to make:  Quart wide-mouthed Mason jar, Half-Gallon Mason jar, and if I'm making a LOT of oil (like I do for making soap), then I'll use a gallon size glass jar.  

Fill the jar one-third to one-half full of the herb.

2.   Now pour your oil of choice over the herbs to within an inch or so of the top of the jar.  Shake well.  You may need to add a little more oil.  Some herbs like to float to the top.  That's ok.  Most will settle to the bottom, and that's fine too.  

3.  Shake your oil daily or a few times a week.  This just helps the herbs release their colors and chemical constituents.

4.  Infuse in a sunny window (my preference). I believe the sun provides some really great energy to the infusion.  Also, it will warm the oil, which helps the herbs release the plant chemicals more easily.  Some herbalists prefer to infuse in a dark cupboard.  I have personally never had a problem keeping mine in a window.  

5.  After about 4 to 6 weeks (I have left mine a lot longer, with no problems), just strain out the herbs.  Bottle up the oil, then store away in a cool, dark, place.  

6.  Double Infusion:  If you want a stronger infusion, after straining out the herbs, just infuse the already infused oil another time with fresh herbs.  You'll have a nice strong infusion this way.  

Method Two:

Crockpot or Stove Top (Double Boiler):

Crockpot:

1.  Using the same ratio of herbs to oil (1:3 or 1:2), combine the herbs and oil in a crockpot.  Allow the herbs to soak in the oil on the LOW setting for several hours.  

2.  Strain, bottle and store in a dark place.

***Note:  In my experience, the crockpot method tends to burn the herbs, and I have ended up with a kind of "crispy" smelling oil.  This is NOT my favorite method, but if you are in a hurry and need the oil quickly, then go for it! You might have better luck than me! I hear others have!

Stove Top/Double Boiler:

1.  Using the same ratio of herbs described already, place oil & herbs into a wide-mouthed quart Mason jar or a double boiler. 

2. If using a Mason jar, place this into a sauce pan with water.  You'll need a large pot, and the water should rise about a third of the way or so up the sides of the Mason jar.

3. Keep the water simmering on very low and watch carefully.  You'll need to infuse for a few hours, and obviously you'll need to watch that water to be sure it doesn't evaporate and add more as needed.  

4. Strain, bottle and store in a dark place!  

That's it!  Super easy!  Let me know how this goes for you, and if you  have other methods, I'd love to hear! 

By the way! Sign up for our Newsletter!  Never miss a thing, and I promise not to over send notes! :-) 

 

Hugs & Self-Reliance,

Heidi

P.S.  This post contains affiliate links, and this simply means that if you click through and make any kind of purchase (not even necessarily the item clicked on), then I will make a small commission at no extra cost to you.  I appreciate your support of HHH and my blogging habit! :-)

P.S.S. This post was shared on these blog hops:  Homestead Blog Hop,  Our Simple Blog Hop, and Grandma's House DIY as well as The Homestead Bloggers Network!  

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