Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

MAKE YOUR OWN SOAP! My Favorite Hot Process Recipe!

MAKE YOUR OWN SOAP! My Favorite Hot Process Recipe!

This recipe is my go to for a moisturizing hot process soap that smells wonderful and contains only natural and good-for-you ingredients.  I like hot process soap making best because you don't have a super long cure time.  You can use the soap within 24 hours if you want!  For fragrance, I use essential oils, and for color, I use herbs and/or clays.  In this post, I am going to give you my base recipe---and you can play around with your own colors and scents! That's the fun part! 

I have several articles for beginners on how to make hot process soap on the blog. You might also enjoy "How to Make Natural Soap in a Crock Pot," "How to Make Goat Milk & Honey Hot Process Soap," "The Secret to Making and Customizing Hot Process Soap," and "Hot Process vs. Cold Process Soap: Which is Better?" for some great information! There are lots of others on the website, too! Take a look! I recommend reading all you can about making soap before starting out. It builds confidence! 

Have you ever wanted to try making your own natural hot process soap? Here is a detailed hot process photo tutorial!  If you've every wanted to learn how to make natural soap of your own, you've got to check out these complete directions! Hot process soap is fast to make, and the soap turns out beautifully!  The essential oil scents last a long time, too!  Basically, you alleviate the curing time so you can use it right away! It's more rustic in appearance---very pretty.  Here's how to get started making your own soap safely.

Have you ever wanted to try making your own natural hot process soap? Here is a detailed hot process photo tutorial!  If you've every wanted to learn how to make natural soap of your own, you've got to check out these complete directions! Hot process soap is fast to make, and the soap turns out beautifully!  The essential oil scents last a long time, too!  Basically, you alleviate the curing time so you can use it right away! It's more rustic in appearance---very pretty.  Here's how to get started making your own soap safely.

A quick note about hot process soap appearance:  It is not as smooth and polished as cold process soap.  It looks a bit rustic, as a matter of fact.  But I personally think that just adds to its beauty!  

**This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you click on the item pictured and choose to make any type of purchase, I will earn a small commission at no cost to you! Thank you for helping support Healing Harvest Homestead!  Heidi :-)
Here are my basic ingredients for making hot process soap--not including essential oils for scent or herbs for color

Here are my basic ingredients for making hot process soap--not including essential oils for scent or herbs for color

A note about lye:  Lye (sodium hydroxide) is an alkaline chemical that reacts with the oils you use.  It is what is responsible for turning the oils into real soap.  In fact, according to the FDA, you can't call a bar of soap, "SOAP" unless it is made with oils and lye.  That's why, if you take a look at commercial bars of "soap" in the stores, you will not find many (if any) labeled "soap," because they are not made with the natural ingredients of lye and oils.  They are now called "cleansing bars" or "beauty bars" or another tricky name.  And they are filled with junk chemicals that are often toxic.  Just saying.  

Another nice thing about making hot process soap is that it will retain the natural glycerin, which is a by-product of the saponification (oil turning to soap) process.  Glycerin is highly moisturizing and great for your skin.  Most commercial cleansing bars have had the glycerin stripped out.

Want to start making your own hot process soap with my BEST recipe? You'll learn how to customize your soap the way YOU want it in my new eBook, plus everything you need to know about making hot process soap. Available on Kindle too!  

Want to start making your own hot process soap with my BEST recipe? You'll learn how to customize your soap the way YOU want it in my new eBook, plus everything you need to know about making hot process soap. Available on Kindle too!  

Safety Precautions:

Making soap with lye means you do have to take some safety precautions.  You need safety goggles or glasses, plastic gloves, and I like to even wear a long sleeve shirt.  Always put your hair back too---it's just better to have it out of the way.  You can get these safety items at any good hardware store! One last safety note:  Keep your children and pets out of your soap making area!

Here are my current safety glasses and gloves.  These probably aren't the best gloves to use because they don't go too far up my arm, but for now, they will work.  I recommend using dishwashing gloves that fit you well.  

Here are my current safety glasses and gloves.  These probably aren't the best gloves to use because they don't go too far up my arm, but for now, they will work.  I recommend using dishwashing gloves that fit you well.  

Ingredients for My Hot Process Recipe---

This will make three pounds of soap

LYE SOLUTION:

1.  7.2 ounces of lye (I use food grade) See the links below to find out where I purchase mine.

2. 15 ounces of distilled water

OIL MIXTURE

1.  15 ounces of Coconut Oil 

2. 15 ounces of Olive Oil (I like to use organic oils as much as possible, and I have found that Costco has the best price overall for good organic olive oil)

3. 12 ounces of Sweet Almond Oil

4. 6 ounces of Shea Butter

5. 1.5 ounces of Castor Oil

You will need to use a kitchen scale to measure out your ingredients, because they do have to be exact.  In fact, the closer you get to the exact amounts, the better your soap will be.  I usually try to be within hundredths of an ounce when measuring.  Here is my favorite scale, and I've tried a few:

Tools You Will Need to Make Hot Process Soap:

1.  A large crockpot

2. A digital kitchen scale

3. Safety glasses and plastic gloves

4. Heat proof containers--I like Pyrex

5. A hand blender

6. A soap mold

**See the note at the end of the article for more information about where I get my tools, oils and supplies.

Directions for Making Hot Process Soap:

  • Get Set Up

Set your crock pot on LOW.  For this 3 pound recipe you will need a large crockpot.

  • Measure your oils and add to the crock pot

I get the solid oils (Coconut & Shea Butter) measured out first, so they will begin softening--especially in the winter when it's cold!  Put these in the crock pot.

  • Get the lye solution going while the oils are melting. 

THIS IS IMPORTANT!  ALWAYS MEASURE OUT THE WATER FIRST.  THEN THE LYE.  ADD THE LYE TO THE WATER!  You never want to add the water to the lye because you may end up with a volcano---and this can be dangerous!  LYE CAN BLIND YOU OR BURN YOU! So please please remember:  ADD LYE TO WATER, not the other way around.  Add it slowly, and mix well.  This solution will become HOT, so again, please be careful.  

Also---be sure to use a heat proof container---I like a large Pyrex pitcher.

Unlike with cold process soap making, you do not have to worry too much about temperature.  I usually let my lye solution sit for a few minutes (away from pets or children) while I get my oils melted down, but you don't have to be concerned too much with how hot or cool anything is with hot process---That's just another added little perk to hot process soap making. You don't have to be spastic about temperature.

  • Pour the lye solution into the crock pot with the oils

Once the oils are melted, gently pour the lye solution into the oils in the crockpot.

  • Mix and bring to trace--

Get your stick blender (you really MUST have one of these for soap making) and begin to stir.  BE SURE TO WEAR YOUR SAFETY GLOVES & GLASSES!  The lye solution is caustic, and the soap mixture will be caustic until the lye is completely cooked out.

Stir until the mixture reaches "trace."  This means it looks like thick pudding, leaving hills on the surface. **It is at this point that you can add any colorants like clays or herbal powders if you want.  (I'll do an article later about different natural ways to add color to your soap.)

  • Cook!

Now put your lid on and "cook" the mixture.  It will not take long, usually about 45 minutes to an hour.    

Soap at trace---It should like like thick pudding on top.

Soap at trace---It should like like thick pudding on top.

This is the first stir.  You can still see opaque areas in the mixture--this means it is still caustic and can burn!  Plus, it's hot anyway.  

This is the first stir.  You can still see opaque areas in the mixture--this means it is still caustic and can burn!  Plus, it's hot anyway.  

  • STIR, STIR, STIR!

In the beginning stages of the cook, you will see the cooking mixture rise up the sides of the crockpot, and if everything is REALLY hot, the whole mass will be rising up!  This is fine---just STIR, STIR, STIR, and it will calm right down. Then continue cooking.  If you see any opaque areas at all, then your soap is NOT ready. 

  • Keep cooking and stirring occasionally.  

You will see it turn into a translucent mass with a gel like consistency.  At this point, it is done.  This usually takes about 45 minutes.  I tend to let it cook a little longer, even after I think it's ready---Just to be sure the lye is completely gone.

See how translucent it is?  

See how translucent it is?  

  • How to test to be sure it's ready--the ZAP Test

I've heard good and bad about this next part, but I am a believer in the ZAP test.  I used to use fancy pH strips to test for the alkalinity of the soap, but IMHO, the ZAP test works best.  All you do is take a little bit of the soap.  It should feel "waxy" in your fingers and begin cooling quickly.  Place some on the tip of your tongue.  If it "ZAPS" you, it is NOT done.  It should just taste like soap, with no tingle or zap.  

If you got the ingredients measured wrong, your soap will definitely have a problem and "get" you!  I actually burned my tongue pretty good one time when I got the measurement mixed up for one of the oils, so just be careful.  If it looks "weird" then it's probably not right.

  • Add your Essential Oils

At this point, while the soap is still in the crockpot, turn the pot off.  Let cool for a minute or two, then you can add your essential oils or scents if you want them.  I generally use about 2 ounces or so for a 3 pound recipe, but you can play around with it.  Essential oils are very expensive, so this will probably affect how much you want to use.  

  • Put the soap into your mold---

Now spoon or pour it into your soap mold!  Tamp it down good to get rid of air pockets.

Putting the hot soap into the mold.  

Putting the hot soap into the mold.  

Jan Berry is one of my soap-making heroes!  This eBook contains some truly great recipes too!  They are all convertible to the hot process method as well! I highly recommend! 

Jan Berry is one of my soap-making heroes!  This eBook contains some truly great recipes too!  They are all convertible to the hot process method as well! I highly recommend! 

Here it is, cooling in the soap mold.  My molds are a little small for a 3 pound batch of soap, but I just let it cool then with a sharp knife, slice off the top and form into soap balls.  The rest of the soap stays in the mold.  

Here it is, cooling in the soap mold.  My molds are a little small for a 3 pound batch of soap, but I just let it cool then with a sharp knife, slice off the top and form into soap balls.  The rest of the soap stays in the mold.  

  • Cool and Unmold--

After it is completely cooled, several hours or even overnight, you can remove the soap block from the mold and cut it!

 I actually don't cut my hot process soap right away.  I have found that the longer I leave it uncut, the longer my scent lasts too!  

You can use it right away!  Enjoy!

That's IT!  You have beautiful, moisturizing, natural soap!  

I hope you enjoyed this complete tutorial, and if you are interested in another excellent step-by-step photo tutorial, check out: How to Make Lavender-Rosemary Soap.  

Here's another great article about how to color your soap using herbs and clays

I hope you will consider signing up for the Healing Harvest Homestead Newsletter!  :-)  When you do, I'll be sending you TWO gifts! One is my eBook on How to Relax Using Herbs! It's full of great ideas I know you'll love! The other is a mini-eBook of my favorite essential oil blends, plus directions for diffusing, making a spray, or a roll-on!

Hugs & Self Reliance!

Heidi

 

This article has been shared at these homestead hops! Please take a visit for more great articles written by people who are into diy, natural and simple living, homesteading, livestock and poultry raising! Fun Stuff! :-)  Grandma's House DIY, Our Simple Hop, Homestead Hop, Homesteader Blog Hop, Dishing It and Digging It, Simple Saturdays, and the Homestead Bloggers Network!  

I like to use Food Grade lye (sodium hydroxide), but you don't have to. 

I buy my safety gloves and glasses at Home Depot or Lowes---or any hardware store will have them.  Hardware stores may also carry sodium hydroxide too, depending on the area of the country you are in!  

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