Hi! I'm Heidi.

 Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

 I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

20 BEST Oils & Butters for Your Homemade Skin Care Products (What are the Pros & Cons of Different Oils & Butters?)

20 BEST Oils & Butters for Your Homemade Skin Care Products (What are the Pros & Cons of Different Oils & Butters?)

When I first started making my own salves, butters, balms, and ointments for our family's skincare needs, I often asked the question, "How much oil or butter should I have...and what kinds should I keep on hand all the time?"  I admit to having been a little overwhelmed by all the options. Although it was exciting to realize how many oil and butter choices there are for making your own skin and body care products...it was hard to know what oils and butters I should start out with for making salves, creams, and soaps?

Perhaps you're like I was: 

Questions raced through my mind: Which is the best oil to use for acne? Which is the best oil for infusing herbs? What butter should I use for super dry skin? How long do these oils last before going rancid, anyway? And do I REALLY need all these oils? 

Besides not knowing very much about the characteristics of different oils when I first started dabbling years ago, the other trouble I ran into was the cost. These oils are often expensive, and the recipes I was using or that I wanted to try often called for a wide variety of different oils.

Or, the recipe called only for small amounts of oil, leaving a great deal left over. It's a terrible thing to purchase a $20 bottle of Kukui Nut Oil, use just a little bit, and have most of that bottle sitting around until it goes rancid. WASTE! Ahem...Ask me how I know

After creating many body care products, including soaps, salves, balms, serums, and more, I thought I'd share a quick rundown of my favorite oils and butters I like to have on hand.

NOTE: My favorite places to purchase quality oils and butters are Starwest Botanicals (I try them first), then Amazon. I prefer to use organic products, so be sure to add that word to the search. However, for Coconut Oil and Olive Oil, I go to Costco! **The links in the body of this article are to Amazon for your convenience.

FTC Disclosure: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article, and if you click through and make any kind of purchase, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you--Heidi (Full Disclosure)
 There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

What are the BEST Oils to Buy for Making Salves, Whipped Butters, Creams and Soaps?

Here are my top recommendations for oils and butters you might want to consider starting out with, especially the first five. I separated my top seven out for you just to make things easier. These are the oils or butters I use most often, and don't want to run out! 

Unless you go hard core and start experimenting like a crazy mad-scientist (like I did there for awhile), there is no reason to purchase a large number of different oils when you first start out. 

My Top Seven Oils & Butters for Handmade Products:

I'm sharing a bit about the characteristics of the following oils and butters for soap making purposes, as well as for their skin care properties. Hopefully this will help make your decision making easier! 

1) Castor Oil

Castor oil is useful for creating that shiny gloss in lip balms. It's also wonderful to use in handmade soap because it's what helps create a very good lather. Some soap makers don't like using more than about 15% in their soaps because they say it can cause a sticky soap. Yuck.

 Yumscious Coconut Oil---So good for so many things, but SOME of us might be allergic!

Yumscious Coconut Oil---So good for so many things, but SOME of us might be allergic!

2) Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is one of the first choices many people new to creating body care products and soap try and use. Indeed, the benefits of coconut oil are touted practically everywhere you turn.

However, some of us are highly allergic to it! How do I know this? Well, when I began creating my first body creams using coconut oil, I had terrible itching and even dry skin! I couldn't figure it out. Wasn't coconut oil supposed to be this wonder oil?

After doing some research, I discovered that my symptoms were caused by an allergy to it. DOH! I was SO bummed. I love coconut oil. But I am one of the people who can't use it in body creams or lotions. 

However, the saponification process during soap making must change the molecular structure enough that it doesn't bother me in handmade soaps. So, I cook with it, and I use it in making soap---but I personally no longer use it in body lotions or creams. 

Coconut Oil is high in lauric acid, and in soap making it provides terrific lather. Coconut oil is also highly cleansing, which in soap making can cause extra dryness to skin. It's a common oil to combine with Olive Oil for a wonderfully moisturizing and cleansing soap. 

3) Cocoa Butter

I LOVE this stuff! Cocoa Butter is absolutely hands down one of my very top favorite oils/butters, and I always keep it on hand. Cocoa Butter is actually a solid fat that comes from cocoa beans. It adds a really nice hardness to your soap bars, but you don't want to use more than about 15% in any recipe. In your body butters and balms, it also adds hardness, so you'll need to plan to temper it with a liquid oil. 

The unrefined cocoa butter will give you that amazing chocolate scent! If you don't want the chocolate scent in your products, just purchase refined cocoa butter. 

4) Olive Oil, Extra Virgin, Organic (EVOO)

Olive oil is just absolutely wonderful for your skin. There's really not many other oils better than olive oil. It's rumored Sophia Loren slathered it on every day, hence her lovely, glowing skin even into old age. 

I love to use olive oil to infuse my herbs in for salves and soaps. I've found that not only do the medicinal properties of the herbs work on my skin, but the conditioning effect of the olive oil is very helpful too. 

Soaps high in olive oil create a nice hard bar of soap, but the lather isn't that great, to be honest. This is why adding lathering oils like castor or coconut oil retains the moisturizing properties of the olive oil while still providing the lather you want. 

I am SO glad I'm not one of the people allergic to olive oil. If you are, I have heard you can substitute rice bran oil, although I have not personally tried this. 

Have you heard of Castille soap? This is soap made from 100% olive oil. It's prized in Italy and elsewhere in the world. 

5) Shea Butter

Shea butter is a softer butter than cocoa butter. It contains nutrients that are not affected by the saponification process when making soap--so you can be sure your skin will benefit from this butter being included in soap recipes. 

Like Cocoa butter, Shea butter is also a solid fat that comes from the nuts of the shea (karite) tree. It helps add some hardness to soaps too. Shea butter is one of my favorite butters for creating body care recipes such as deodorants, body creams, and just using alone. 

6) Sweet Almond Oil

Almond oil is very high in Vitamin E, and even though it is fairly emollient, it's also highly moisturizing. What a great combination! 

Almond oil is my second favorite oil to infuse herbs in for medicinal purposes, making salves or soaps. 

7) Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil doesn't have the shelf life of other oils, so if you plan to use some in a recipe, you should also plan to get it used up within about six months or so. Rancid oils are really pretty gross. 

Sunflower oil is high in Vitamins A, D, and E, and your skin will love some of that sunflower oil! This is another oil to use somewhat sparingly in soaps, but is great to use in body care products that will be used relatively quickly.

 Cocoa Butter is a hard butter, and if it is unrefined, it smells like delicious chocolate! Mmmmm......

Cocoa Butter is a hard butter, and if it is unrefined, it smells like delicious chocolate! Mmmmm......

Other Useful Oils & Butters:

8) Apricot Kernel Oil

Apricot Kernel Oil is a great substitute for Almond Oil if you are allergic to tree nuts. If you decide to substitute out the almond oil in a soap recipe for apricot kernel oil, be sure to run your numbers through a soap calculator. I'll provide links at the end of the article and address this a bit further.

Apricot Kernel oil is highly moisturizing, too.

9) Argan Oil

There's been a lot of hype about Argan oil in recent years, and for good reason. It is said to help promote hair growth, and it is anti-aging and anti-inflammatory for skin care uses. 

Argan oil can be pretty expensive, besides creating a softer bar, so only 10% or less should be used for making soap. Use it as you wish for skin creams and butters! It's just lovely.

10) Avocado Oil

Avocado oil is rich in fatty acids. It comes from the fruit, so if you are allergic to tree nuts, it's a great choice for both soap and salve-making. It's incredibly good for your skin, however, the greenish color may effect the final color of your soap or salve.

11) Babassu Oil

Babassu oil comes from a kind of palm in South America, but it is not the same palm species that is being ecologically affected by overproduction of palm oil. Babassu oil is high in lauric acid, just like coconut oil, and it can make a good substitute if you are allergic to coconut oil (as I am) in your skin care products.

It's more expensive, though---and remember, the saponification process during soap making changes the structure of the oil, so many who are allergic to coconut oil in lotions and creams can still take advantage of it in their soap. I know this from first-hand experience. For those with extreme allergies, perhaps Babassu oil would be a great one to try! 

The highly cleansing properties of Babassu oil also can cause dryness in some people, just like coconut oil. 

12) Grape Seed Oil

Grape Seed oil is a lightweight oil that is very high in anti-oxidant plant compounds. It's slightly astringent and emollient, meaning it soaks into your skin well. Some people believe it has good anti-aging properties and it may also speed wound healing of the skin.

It's widely used in many cosmetics and skin care products, and I think it's a great oil for use in making salves, etc., especially for people with oilier skin. 

Grape Seed Oil is also a common culinary oil, and you may just have this popular oil hanging around in your kitchen! 

 Here is Almond Oil: Lightweight and very emollient. It soaks into your skin quickly!

Here is Almond Oil: Lightweight and very emollient. It soaks into your skin quickly!

13) Hemp Seed Oil

Hemp Seed oil is quite high in fatty acids, making it quite helpful to the skin. It heals and soothes, and may be a wonderful addition to a soap recipe. Like avocado oil, it has a green color, and may affect the final color of your soaps and balms. 

14) Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is actually a wax that has similar properties to the surface layer of oil on human skin. It provides a wonderful protective barrier for over-washed hands or dry skin. It's great for both dry and oily skin types. 

15) Kukui Nut Oil

Kukui Nut oil is thought to be one of the oils very useful in treating difficult skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis. It is highly moisturizing, too. 

15) Lard

Lard is GREAT, especially if it has been minimally processed. If you know someone who renders their own lard, and you can get some of this, I highly recommend it! Lard is a solid fat that comes from pigs. (Tallow most usually comes from cows, and is also great.) 

If you are using lard for making soap, it is one of the oils you can use in larger amounts, as it contributes a good lather along with skin conditioning and a bit of hardness. 

I haven't tried lard for use in salves, butters, or balms, and unless we are in a SHTF situation, I really don't plan to. Just saying.

16) Macadamia Nut Oil

Macadamia Nut oil is wonderful for you, both inside and out. It's a light oil with a pale yellow color, and is extremely sensitive to heat and light. It will turn rancid more quickly than other oils, so if you plan on using Macadamia Nut oil, you might want to purchase it in smaller amounts---or plan on cooking with it. 

Macadamia Nut oil is high in monounsaturated fatty acids, and like jojoba oil, it is similar to the natural oils created by our own skin. 

17) Mango Butter

Mango Butter is solid, but is also a soft butter. In your soap, it will not create a great deal of hardness, so it's best combined in small amounts with other typical oils, such as coconut and/or olive oil. Mango Butter is wonderful for very dry skin.

18) Meadowfoam Seed Oil

Meadowfoam Seed oil is great for using in salves, balms, etc. It's a very stable oil, and can help lengthen the shelf life of a product. Meadowfoam seed oil is high in anti-oxidants and can be helpful for mature skin. It also is absorbed quite quickly. I like using it in homemade beard oils.

 We all know how wonderful Olive Oil is, and it is one of the best oils, in my opinion, to use for making soaps and salves. 

We all know how wonderful Olive Oil is, and it is one of the best oils, in my opinion, to use for making soaps and salves. 

19) Pumpkin Seed Oil

Pumpkin Seed oil is high in fatty acids, and it's one of the oils that is great for both oily and dry skin. It is quickly absorbed, doesn't clog pores, yet is highly moisturizing at the same time. Besides the fact that it is a great oil to consume for your health, it's wonderful for use in creating skin care products too.

20) Rosehip Seed Oil

I love this stuff! Rosehip Seed oil is exceptional for aging and mature skin. Due to its high cost, however, I generally only use it in creating body care creams, butters, salves, lip balms, etc. I personally think it costs too much to add to soap, but if you can afford it, I say go for it! 

Final Thoughts on Different Oils and Butters for Making Skin Care Products

I hope this little rundown of oils and butters was helpful. It's so hard to know which oils and butters to start out with. We all heard how great coconut oil is for us (and it certainly is), but nobody back then ever said a person could be allergic to it on the surface of their skin! Yikes! 

We are all different, with different body make ups and compositions and needs. It's a great idea to play around with different oils if you are able to---and this way, you'll find the perfect combination for you and family. 

Hopefully by giving you this little start, it will help you narrow down your options a little bit, though. It's incredibly how many useful kinds of oils and butters are now available to us for our use! 

What do you think? Do you have an oil or butter you like to use a lot that I should add to the list? Or maybe you have a comment about one of the oils I mentioned in the list? I'd love for you to leave a comment in the comments section!

You might also be interested in these articles: 20 Best Essential Oils to Use in Soap Making, Common Natural Colorants for Handmade Soap, How to Make Cold Sore Salve, How to Make Pain Relief Salve....and LOTS more on the blog!

Hugs & Self-Reliance,

Heidi

P.S. If you haven't done so yet, I hope you'll sign up for our newsletter! You'll never miss a thing, and I'll be sending you three eBooks free! One is on using herbs to relax, one is on using essential oil blends, and one is about how to get your homestead started no matter where you live! Enjoy! 

P.P.S. Don't forget to check out Starwest Botanicals for your natural body products, herbs, and essential oils for making soaps & salves!

 There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

 There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

There are SO many choices for oils & butters to use in making handmade products. So which are the best oils and butters for making soap, salves, and balms? Here are 20 best oils & butters, along with my very best choices of butters and balms for beginners. 

 

 

 

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