Hi! I'm Heidi.

 Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

 I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Make Hot Process Bastille Honey Soap---Great for Babies!

How to Make Hot Process Bastille Honey Soap---Great for Babies!

What on earth is Bastille soap? I wondered the same thing! Bastille soap is a close relative of Castille soap...and if you're not sure what that is (I wasn't, not too long ago), then you'll want to know Castille soap is basically a pure olive oil soap--no other oils are used at all. Castille soap is incredibly softening and good for your skin, due to the olive oil, however, it doesn't lather very well, and it requires a VERY long curing time. It can also be a bit finicky to make.

To counteract the downsides of Castille soap, a soap maker many years ago came up with Bastille soap. Bastille soap includes any soap that is at least 70% olive oil. Other oils can be added to help with lather, shorten the curing time, etc. Even though it's not a pure olive oil soap, it's STILL wonderful for your skin due to the very high olive oil content. 

This recipe is for a Honey Bastille Hot Process Soap---If you've been around here very long, you know how I feel about hot process soap: I LOVE it best. So, generally, I'll have to mess around with a recipe in order to convert it to a hot process version that works out well. This Bastille Soap is no exception! 

I decided to add honey to this soap for the additional skin soothing benefits....and I just wanted to mess around. :-) It's scented with Lavender Essential oil and just a touch of Vanilla extract to give it a bit of sweetness. Overall, it's a very gentle, soothing soap, suitable for babies and young children or people with sensitive skin. 

You know, a lot of soap recipes call for coconut oil because it can help the lathering process. But when I learned I had an allergy to coconut oil used on my skin, I was leery of soaps made with it. But I soon learned the saponification process does change the chemical make up of the oils, therefore I can tolerate coconut oil in soaps.

But I decided to make this soap without the coconut oil this time, even though the lather of the soap was a touch affected, and I'm not one bit sorry even still. It turned out great!

I have to tell you about the smell of this soap as it was cooking! It smelled JUST like a cookie! I don't know if it was the oils or the honey added in....but it smelled REALLY good. Maybe I just have a weird nose, but this was a very nice soap making experience. :-)

Usually scents don't last in the soap, except for the essential oils added at the end....but this soap actually retained a little of that cookie scent, even after cooling down and having the essential oils added in!  It turned out to be a really nice soap! 

 Bastille soap is the perfect soap for people with sensitive skin and babies too. Here's my recipe for Honey Bastille Soap using the Hot Process Soap Making method. It's scented with Lavender and Vanilla, and is just a beautiful soap! Find out how to make hot process Bastille soap! 

Bastille soap is the perfect soap for people with sensitive skin and babies too. Here's my recipe for Honey Bastille Soap using the Hot Process Soap Making method. It's scented with Lavender and Vanilla, and is just a beautiful soap! Find out how to make hot process Bastille soap! 

FTC Affiliate Disclosure: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article. If you click through and make any kind of purchase I will receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you--Heidi

How to Make Honey Hot Process Bastille Soap

My version of Bastille soap was inspired by Jan Berry's Bastille soap recipe as well as a recipe I got from another friend who uses honey in hers. You can find out more about Jan's soap making recipes and learn to make soap from her in this link

If you are new to soap making or to making hot process soap, you should probably read through one or both of these articles because they are more detailed with lots of pictures: How to Make Hot Process Soap and/or Lavender-Rosemary-Vanilla Hot Process Soap. You'll find out when your soap is ready for sure as well as answers to all your hot process questions. 

Ingredients for Honey Bastille Soap Recipe

Lye Solution:

9.3 ounces distilled water

3.54 ounces sodium hydroxide (lye)

Oil Mixture:

21 ounces olive oil (Yep! That much! This is a soap with 75% olive oil.) **Costco has the best prices!

4.5 ounces shea butter

2.5 ounces castor oil (helps with lather)

Colorant:

I added about a tablespoon of honey to the oil mixture as it was melting in the crock pot, and it gave the soap a pretty brown color. That's not why I added the honey, but that is what it did to the color.

Scent:

1.5 ounces Lavender Essential Oil (Link is to Starwest Botanicals, where I get essential oils for soap making)

.5 ounce pure vanilla extract (no chemical additives, sweeteners, etc.) **Find out how to make your own Vanilla Extract! , along with a story about Vanilla.

 Learn to make soap! Jan Berry instructions are where I first learned to make cold process soap!  This is a wonderful resource to have and will get you started!  

Learn to make soap! Jan Berry instructions are where I first learned to make cold process soap! This is a wonderful resource to have and will get you started! 

Tools You'll Need to Make Hot Process Soap

The tools needed for hot process soap differ just a little bit from cold process soap. The chemical process is sped up during the cook time, and although hot process soap is the more traditional method, these days modern soap makers use a crock pot! Here are the tools you'll need:

1) A large crock pot, and I prefer the manual ones. 

2) A hand blender

3) A kitchen scale for measuring

4) Wooden spoons

5) Heat resistant pitcher for the lye solution

6) Safety Gear (glasses & gloves)

7) Soap mold

Directions for Honey Bastille Hot Process Soap

Step 1) Measure your oils (not essential oils) into the crock pot. Set to low.

Step 2) Get your safety gear on! Measure out your water. Then the lye. Pour the lye into the water and mix well.

***Never pour water into the lye because you might just get a lye explosion, and that can be dangerous. 

Step 3) Once the oils are melted together in the crock pot, gently pour in the lye solution.

Step 4) Mix to trace with the hand blender.

Step 5) Cook until ready!

For how to know when your soap is ready, see either this article or this article.  

Step 6) Press firmly into your soap mold

Step 7) Allow to cool

Step 8) Remove and enjoy! You can cut your bars as needed and leave the loaf intact if you like. This actually helps preserve the scent of the soap too---just another little perk to the hot process method of soap making!

  Ready to learn about making hot process soap?  Find out how with my best recipe EVER and tons of ways to customize it and create your very own hot process soap versions. Make hot process soap with CONFIDENCE!  Also available on Amazon Kindle , if you prefer. 

Ready to learn about making hot process soap? Find out how with my best recipe EVER and tons of ways to customize it and create your very own hot process soap versions. Make hot process soap with CONFIDENCE! Also available on Amazon Kindle, if you prefer. 

Final Thoughts About Bastille Honey Hot Process Soap

This soap cooked a little more slowly than most of my other soap recipes, but in the end it turned out beautifully! It smells incredible, too! Most soaps retain a bit of the scent of the saponifation process of the oils, but this soap actually smelled REALLY good, and you really wouldn't have to use essential oils if you didn't want to. 

It lathers ok, not as well as I would have hoped with that much castor oil, but it still is a wonderfully soothing and softening soap for sensitive skin. I really like it! I'm excited to try other versions of Bastille soap now! 

Do you make hot process soap? Bastille soap? We'd love to hear your questions, experiences, and advice, so please leave a comment in the comments section! :-) 

Hugs & Self-Reliance,

Heidi

P.S. If you haven't done so yet, I hope you'll get signed up for our weekly newsletter! You'll never miss a thing, you'll get information and tips not on the blog, and I'll be sending you three free eBook downloads too! (Essential Oils Blends, Using Herbs to Relax, and How to Get Your Homestead Started No Matter Where You Live!)

P.P.S. There are many other soap making articles on the website. You may be interested in these: Cold Process vs. Hot Process Soap, 20 Best Essential Oils to Use in Your Hot Process Soap, How to Layer Hot Process Soap...and many more! 

4 Ways to Beat the Winter Blues (S.A.D.), PLUS a Recipe for Happiness Herbal Tea!

4 Ways to Beat the Winter Blues (S.A.D.), PLUS a Recipe for Happiness Herbal Tea!

Out of Wrapping Paper? Here are Twelve Great Alternatives!

Out of Wrapping Paper? Here are Twelve Great Alternatives!

0