Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

Healthy Bones Tea Recipe: High Nutrition and Minerals for Your Bones' Health

Healthy Bones Tea Recipe: High Nutrition and Minerals for Your Bones' Health

I’m sharing one of my favorite nutritional herbal teas that is wonderful for the health of your bones and skeletal system. This tea blend recipe is also terrific for growing pains and aching, creaky joints; as well as the common female ailment, osteoporosis. Besides all that, it’s EASY! Enjoy!

We all want healthy bones, right? To be able to stand tall and strong and to have others feel confident in our strength. Great posture is inherent in letting others know we mean business; we need our strong bones to run, jump, and be active; and our bones are the body’s foundation. And most certainly we don’t want achy joints or creaky knees!

You don’t want to be walking around with your bones aching and having a hard time putting those shoulders back! What’s a person to do? Drink some custom homemade herbal mineral-rich tea, that’s what!

People ask me in my herbal practice to make them a tea blend to support the health of their bones—-the skeletal system. Problems in our skeletal system can manifest in many ways: pains, poor posture, and softening or brittle bones.

Now I’m sharing it with you! The herbs in this tea blend are tasty, full of vitamins and minerals to support your body’s mineral needs, AND it’s so easy to make.

FTC Disclosure: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article. If you click through and make any kind of purchase, I may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Take charge of your health! Check out  The Confident Herbalist: A Guide to Home Herbalism.

Take charge of your health! Check out The Confident Herbalist: A Guide to Home Herbalism.

Healthy Bones Herbal Tea Recipe: A Vitamin Tea Rich in Minerals

The herbs I used in this tea formula, or blend, work synergistically to help your body get the minerals and vitamins it needs. Here’s a bit about each of the herbs in this tea blend:

Nettle (Urtica dioica):

Nettle is probably my favorite nutritive herb because it is so full of all kinds of bone supporting minerals, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, phosphorous, and a bit of sodium which gives it a slightly salty flavor. It’s also high in vitamins A, C, K, and B vitamins.

Along with the nutritional benefits, nettle happens to be an excellent herb to take starting a month or so before allergy season, as it helps your body build up tolerance to histamine. So, take your nettle any way you can get it, even powdered!

Nettle—-a lovely stinging plant, but OH so good for you!

Nettle—-a lovely stinging plant, but OH so good for you!

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita):

I added the peppermint to this tea blend for a couple of reasons. One is simply for the taste. Most of the active herbs in this tea have very “green” or “herbal” tastes that for some aren’t that pleasant. The peppermint is a wonderful flavor enhancing herb besides being a carminative, making it excellent for your digestion.

NOTE: If you suffer from GERD, avoid peppermint.

The other reason I decided to add peppermint is that it helps improve your mood as well as your attention and focus. Who doesn’t need that, right?

Just a little extra perk besides the cooling and aromatic flavor.

One of America’s favorite herbs: Peppermint

One of America’s favorite herbs: Peppermint

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense):

Horsetail grows in wet, marshy areas, and is exceptionally high in minerals. Silica, especially, is found in high levels in this herb. Silica supports connective tissue and collagen, which means it’s great for your joints, hair, skin, and fingernails. Silica also helps build healthy bones.

We all know about calcium, right? Well, horsetail is also high in this skeleton loving mineral! Horsetail also contains plenty of iron, magnesium, and potassium. It’s a great all-around herb to support skeletal health.

Horsetail grows in wet, marshy places.

Horsetail grows in wet, marshy places.

Oatstraw (Avena sativa):

Oatstraw is exactly what it sounds like: the stalk of the oat plant. It’s harvested while still green, and you can purchase it along with or in addition to the oat tops. According to herbalist Maria Groves in her much loved book, Body into Balance, “ounce for ounce it offers approximately four times more vitamins and minerals than oatmeal, and the mild hay flavor works well in tea formulas.”

This is my experience as well—-I love adding oatstraw to my herbal tea blends, both for the high nutritional content as well as the mild and soothing flavor.

Oatstraw has high levels of calcium, magnesium, and iron as well as some silica. It also contains a good amount of B vitamins.

These are the oat tops, but the stalk is what I used in this tea recipe.

These are the oat tops, but the stalk is what I used in this tea recipe.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis):

I like a little color in my herbal teas, and calendula never fails to deliver with its bright yellow or orange petals. That’s actually the main reason I added calendula to this tea, HOWEVER, it happens to have some very nice medicinal benefits.

It’s an excellent lymphatic, helping to move fluid and lymph in the body. It’s a fabulous anti-inflammatory, is helpful for the digestive system, and is excellent for the skin. In this blend it is a supporting herb, and you can find out more about formulating teas in this article if you’re interested.

Calendula flowers—-These edible flowers are good for you, and they add a pop of beautiful color to this green tea.

Calendula flowers—-These edible flowers are good for you, and they add a pop of beautiful color to this green tea.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale):

Ginger is a stimulating herb in this formula. This doesn’t mean it acts like caffeine. On the contrary, it simply helps with circulation. But as a stimulating and activating herb in a tea formula, it actually helps increase the value of the nutritive herbs by helping them release their powerful mineral constituents.

Other uses of ginger that make it a good addition to this herbal formula are that it’s great for reducing inflammatory pain, which is great for aches and pains in the bones.

Besides this? It’s really a delicious herb and adds a nice punch to this flavor profile.

You can find out more about using different herbs in my article on how to formulate your own tea blends.

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia or verum):

I added the cinnamon to this herbal blend because of the pungent taste to complement ginger. However, as an aside, cinnamon is an excellent herb for supporting the health of your teeth!

Ingredients for Healthy Bones Tea

Ingredients:

3 parts Nettle (Urtica dioica)

3 parts Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

2 parts Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)

1 part Oatstraw (Avena sativa)

1 part Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

1 part Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

1 part Cinnamon (Cinnamomum spp.)

Where to Source Your Herbs for the Tea

You can grow or forage many of these herbs yourself, but if you are not ready for these activities, you can purchase quality herbs in bulk from Starwest Botanicals, my favorite online herb store. There are other good online stores as well, but Starwest is my number one go-to.

Directions for Making Your Tea Blend

About the Parts Method, or Traditional Herbalist’s Way:

You probably noticed I didn’t use typical measurements like grams or ounces or teaspoons or cups, etc. I used the traditional folk system of parts, which is my preferred way to create a tea recipe.

One of the advantages of this system is you can choose any measuring tool you like as a “part.” Then you simply measure out the herbs in the appropriate ratio.

For example, let’s just say I want to make a batch of herbal tea that isn’t huge. I’d use a smaller “part” for measurement, such as a tablespoon. Then, I’d add that number of tablespoons for the number of parts in the recipe.

If I wanted to make a larger amount of tea, then I could choose a larger “part,” perhaps a half-cup measurement (which would make a LOT of tea).

After you determine the measurement you want to use based on about how much of the blend you want to make, just get a bowl and measure out your parts. Blend the herbs together with your hands. Then store in a glass jar. Be sure you label your tea so you remember what it is for!

If you’re wondering how to prepare this lovely tea, take a look at this article: How to Make the Perfect Herbal Tea Infusion or this one: Herbal Water Extracts, which gives you a complete overview of teas and water infusion methods such as decoctions and others.

Here is the blended tea: Healthy Bones Tea.

Here is the blended tea: Healthy Bones Tea.

Final Thoughts on Healthy Bones Tea

If you are my age, which is mid-fifties, or are a woman of any age, or are a teenage boy going through a growth spurt and dealing with the accompanying growing pains, or a man who wants some powerful posture….this is a wonderful tea for you!

Or, perhaps you simply want to be sure you get an adequate amount of nutrition and minerals in your daily diet? This is a great supplemental tea for you to drink throughout your day.

You know what’s best of all about making your own herbal tea blends? YOU get to decide what goes into them, and you’ll know there are absolutely no chemicals, strange flavorings, or other additives that don’t belong in your drink.

Would you like to find out more about being a home herbalist? Would you like to stop worrying about whether or not that over the counter medication you’re giving your kids is killing their little livers? Consider signing up for my course, The Confident Herbalist: A Guide to Home Herbalism.

This course will take you from being uncomfortable using herbs to feeling confident and empowered in your ability to take care of your family’s common ailments and natural health!

And if you are already an experienced herbalist, I recommend the Herbal Academy of New England. They have courses for all levels of experience!

AND if you’re looking for a great herbal education support group, take a look at my private Facebook group, Practical Herbs with Heidi. It’s a fun, active group full of great learning and support.

You may enjoy these related articles too:

Sensuous Skin, Healthy Hair Herbal Tea

Throat Soothing Tea for Sore Throats

Liver De-Tox Tea

Herbal Tea for Male Support: A Great Tea for the Manly Body

There are many more on the website too! Go on over and browse around! And of course, if you have questions or comments, please leave them in the comments section!

Hugs, Health, and Self-Reliance,

Heidi

P.S. If you haven’t already, sign up for my weekly newsletter! You’ll never miss a thing, and you’ll get immediate access to the Resource Library, where you’ll find eBooks, guides, and lots more to support you in your self-reliant journey.

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Nothing beats a cup of nutritive tea!

Nothing beats a cup of nutritive tea!

References:

De la Foret, Rosalee. Alchemy of Herbs. 2017. Hay House Publishing.

Groves, Maria. Body into Balance. 2016. Storey Publishing.

Wolf, Rachel Jepson. Herbal Adventures. Quarto Publishing Group. 2018.

Young, Devon. The Backyard Herbal Apothecary. Page Street Publishing. 2019.

Disclaimer:

The information in this article and elsewhere in my content is for educational purposes only and not meant or implied to treat, cure, diagnose, or prevent any disease or be an alternative to proper medical care. Please seek advice from a medical professional for your ailments and before using any herbs or essential oils. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.

Growing paints? Weak bones? Osteoporosis? Brittle bones? Make this healthy herbal tea recipe blend to support the health of your bones and make them stronger. It’s easy and simple to make, and by drinking it daily, your bones, skin, fingernails, and hair will be healthy, strong, and beautiful. Especially for female and teenage bone ailments. #herbaltea #femaleailments #growingpains #teafor #healthy #bones #plantmedicine #healingharvesthomestead

Growing paints? Weak bones? Osteoporosis? Brittle bones? Make this healthy herbal tea recipe blend to support the health of your bones and make them stronger. It’s easy and simple to make, and by drinking it daily, your bones, skin, fingernails, and hair will be healthy, strong, and beautiful. Especially for female and teenage bone ailments. #herbaltea #femaleailments #growingpains #teafor #healthy #bones #plantmedicine #healingharvesthomestead

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