Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

Hibiscus-Mint Herbal Tea Recipe for Summer Refreshment

Hibiscus-Mint Herbal Tea Recipe for Summer Refreshment

In honor of the Summer Solstice on June 21, I decided to share my secret and amazing herbal tea recipe I created years ago for just this occasion. The base of this tea contains hibiscus and mint, as well as a number of other herbs to round out the refreshing flavor. It can be made hot or iced, and tastes divine! It’s the perfect herbal tea for any hot summer day…and it’s good for you!

The color of this tea is just fabulous! It turns a gorgeous red, and with a sprig of mint….makes a delightful refreshment for serving your friends and any company you might be entertaining too. Or…just yourself!

FTC Disclosure: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article. If you make any kind of purchase, I may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Hibiscus-Mint Cooling Herbal Tea for Summer Heat

The health benefits of Hibiscus-Mint tea are many as well. Let’s take a look at the herbs this tea contains, then I’ll tell you how to prepare it hot or iced with some ideas for serving it up, too!

Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis):

What a tantalizingly beautiful flower the hibiscus is! I remember the first time I saw one growing naturally in Hawaii….I was in awe. It’s Latin name is Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, and it is a member of the malva family, Malvaceae (hollyhocks, mallows, etc. are relatives).

Hibiscus is the national flower of Malaysia and the state flower of Hawaii, and it’s no wonder, as it grows well in warm, moist tropical areas. It’s been used for various health issues since ancient times, and recorded uses have been found on Egyptian and Middle Eastern digs.

Known as “sour tea” in Iran and prepared as a common warm weather refreshment in Mexico, it contains some exceptional health benefits. Mainly it is beneficial for cardiovascular health, including healthy blood pressure and maintaining proper cholesterol levels.

Hibiscus contains high levels of acid, including malic and citric acid which makes it quite sour tasting and high in vitamin C. It also contains an acid that is completely unique to hibiscus called allo-hydroxycitric acid lactone. The flowers also contain quercetin, anthocyanins, and some alkaloids.

If you want to do something nice for your heart health, hibiscus is a great tea to drink every day. I suggest brushing your teeth afterward, however, to be sure the acids aren’t left behind on your teeth, as some studies suggest drinking hibiscus every day may damage your tooth enamel.

Hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis )

Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis):

Lemon balm is a mild relaxing nervine, perfect for enhancing your mental state. I added it to this tea because the mild lemon flavor balances the harsher sour taste of the hibiscus, while calming and soothing and cooling overheated, stressful conditions.

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita):

Some people think of peppermint as a winter herb, and indeed, it is common in peppermint sticks and canes, famous at Christmas time. However, it is a cooling herb that balances the flavor in this tea perfectly. The minty taste offsets the sour punch of the hibiscus. It also provides cooling benefits to the body.

Peppermint ( Mentha x piperita )

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

Rose Petals (Rosa spp.):

First off, rose petals are just beautiful (as are hibiscus). I love adding them to herbal teas for their beauty, and also for the benefits they impart. Rose petals are cooling and astringent, making them another perfect addition to this tea. The subtle taste softens the somewhat harsher taste of the sour, and works really well with the peppermint.

Roses calm and soothe the spirit and the heart. Because of this, like lemon balm, they are a relaxing addition to this tea recipe.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale):

Ginger is a warming herb, which counterbalances the many cooling herbs, but I wanted to add it in for its stimulating qualities and taste. The spicy taste, along with the lemony tartness and minty refreshment of the other herbs is interesting and provides depth to this blend.

Also, since it is a stimulating herb, it helps enhance the medicinal actions of the other herbs included in this tea. Especially if you are drinking hibiscus for your heart health, adding an activating herb like ginger helps get the health benefits to your body.

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia):

I thought adding a little touch of cooling, floral lavender would be an extra nice touch, and I was right. Everyone who tastes this tea just loves it. You don’t want too much lavender, though, as it provides a bit of “antiseptic” taste in too great amounts. Just a hint. That’s all you want.

Lavender ( Lavendula angustifolia )

Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia)

Optional Herbs:

Here are two other options I’ve tried in this blend that I’ve just really enjoyed.

Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis):

One of these options is an herb from South America, Yerba mate, green (not roasted). If you need a bit of sustained energy without the rush, Yerba mate will give you this, along with a green flavor that actually enhances the other flavors in this tea.

Red Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis):

Rooibos is a South African herb, also having many health benefits. It’s deep red color adds even more red depth to this blend. Also, the taste of this herb is quite unique. In my opinion, it is very soft, with vanilla overtones, and I really enjoy drinking it plain or in blends. It doesn’t have caffeine.

Here’s the blend! I threw in some freshly dried foraged red clover too, for some extra color and nutrition.

Here’s the blend! I threw in some freshly dried foraged red clover too, for some extra color and nutrition.

Hibiscus-Mint Herbal Tea Recipe

I use the parts method of measurement because this allows me to make as much or as little as I like. You can find out more about this method of measuring out your herbal blends in this article if it is confusing or doesn’t make sense here.

** 3 parts hibiscus

** 3 parts peppermint

** 2 parts lemon balm

** 1 part rose petals (be sure these are organic because roses are among the most highly sprayed herbs out there)

** 1 part ginger

** 1/2 part lavender

Optional: Green yerba mate or red rooibos or both

NOTE: The links above are for Amazon for your convenience. However, I generally buy the great majority of my herbs directly from Starwest Botanicals. I like this better because I have more choices in quantity and quality of the herbs.

Here it is infusing in a  double glass walled infuser cup . These are so handy…and pretty too.

Here it is infusing in a double glass walled infuser cup. These are so handy…and pretty too.

Preparing Your Tea

Simply place all the herbs in a bowl, and mix together gently with your hands. I love the act of making my own blends at home because it is such a beautiful tactile experience, running your hands through the herbs and watching the beautiful blend emerge.

You can find out everything you need to know about preparing a great hot or iced herbal tea in this article: Herbal Loose Leaf Tea for the Beginner: The Art of Tea.

To make your tea iced, you can simply add ice after it’s had a chance to infuse, which will dilute it somewhat. The other option is to make your tea, strain out the herbs, and refrigerate it until it’s nice and cold.

Feel free to add mint leaves for a beautiful green and cooling garnish!

Final Reflections on Hibiscus-Mint Tea for the Summer Solstice Season

This is one of my favorite teas to drink anytime, but especially during the hot summer months. Here in N. Idaho, even though it is late June, it’s still cold. I’ll admit…I’m yearning for a hot day, and I’ll have a big glass pitcher of this made up and ready to go!

I made this tea blend for a party once, and it was a big hit! If you like, add some summer fruits to it as well, such as cantaloupe, cucumber, and even watermelon. Just absolutely delicious, cooling, and refreshing!

Hopefully, you enjoy making this delightful summertime loose leaf tea recipe, and be sure to share this recipe (and my website) with friends!

Here are some other articles you may enjoy:

Manly Man Tea for Male Support

Sensuous Skin and Healthy Hair Tea

How to Get Started Using Herbs (a series for the beginning herbalist)

And there are a TON more over on the blog, so head over and browse around! :-) Also, if you are interested in herbal eBooks, take a look in the shop.

AND…if you are considering a course to fast-track you into home herbalism with confidence, take a look at my school.

Hugs, Health, and Self-Reliance,

Heidi

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Hot this summer? Here is a refreshing, hibiscus-mint herbal tea recipe that is also good for you! Easy to make and prepare, this tea is perfect for iced tea drinks and summer parties. And it’s beautiful red color shines! #hibiscusminttea #hibiscusteabenefits #howtomake #hibiscustea #hibiscus #healingharvesthomestead

Hot this summer? Here is a refreshing, hibiscus-mint herbal tea recipe that is also good for you! Easy to make and prepare, this tea is perfect for iced tea drinks and summer parties. And it’s beautiful red color shines! #hibiscusminttea #hibiscusteabenefits #howtomake #hibiscustea #hibiscus #healingharvesthomestead

Straining the herbs from the infuser cup…..

Straining the herbs from the infuser cup…..

It’s a cloudy, cool summer day here——In July I’ll be drinking this by the quart! Isn’t it just lovely?

It’s a cloudy, cool summer day here——In July I’ll be drinking this by the quart! Isn’t it just lovely?

Disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor. In no manner, stated or implied, is any wording in any content on any platform owned and managed by Healing Harvest Homestead or me meant to treat, cure, diagnose, or prevent any disease or illness. Please be sure to seek advice from your medical professional before using any herbs or essential oils. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.

Reference:

https://www.gaiaherbs.com/blogs/seeds-of-knowledge/the-surprising-health-benefits-of-hibiscus

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