Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Wife. Grandma. Gardener. Student of Plant Medicine and Herbs. Whole30 Fan. Poultry Farmer. Trying to be Courageously DIY. Essential Oil Enthusiast. Beginning Horsewoman. New Homesteader in Mid-Life.

Do you want to feel empowered by being able to be as self-sufficient as possible in this uncertain world?  Me too!  Join me in this learning journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Make Hot Process Soap! Recipe for Lavender-Rosemary-Vanilla Pink Clay Soap

How to Make Hot Process Soap! Recipe for Lavender-Rosemary-Vanilla Pink Clay Soap

I've been getting lots of requests for soaps lately!  One of the soaps I make is a Lavender-Rosemary-Vanilla soap with French Pink Clay.  I use the hot process method, which for me, is simpler than the cold process style because I don't have to worry about temperatures of the oils and lye solution.  PLUS, with my impatient nature, I can use hot process soap right away!  No curing time needed.  

The blend of essential oils I use in this soap is extraordinary!  I just can't think of a better word.  The Lavender is calming, the Rosemary increases clarity, and the Vanilla is just plain soothing.  I also add a natural colorant of French Pink Clay which gives the soap an amazing "slip."  This means it's great for shaving too!  I add in some organic Lavender flowers for texture and exfoliation---and BAM!  Amazing, lathering, long lasting, natural herbal soap that is GREAT for your skin, mind, and spirit! 

Ingredients for Lavender-Rosemary Soap

The Oils:

15 ounces Coconut Oil

15 ounces Olive Oil (I've found Costco has the best price!)

12 ounces Sweet Almond Oil

6 ounces Shea Butter

1.5 ounces Castor Oil

Lye Solution:

15 ounces distilled or filtered water

7.2 ounces food grade lye

(You don't have to use Food Grade Lye, but I always do.  It just feels better to me.)

Essential Oils:

1 ounce Lavender Essential Oil

.5 ounce Rosemary Essential Oil

1.5 ounces Vanilla Extract (no sugar added)

Textures & Colorants:

3 tablespoons French Pink Clay

3 tablespoons Lavender Flowers

Where I Usually Buy My Products:

Honestly, I usually buy my olive oil and coconut oil from Costco. You can get the price cheaper for coconut oil on Amazon if you look, though.  My other soaping items are from Amazon or from Bulk Apothecary (link coming soon).  I get my essential oils for soap making from Starwest Botanicals.    Their prices for bulk-type essential oils are reasonable, and the oils are actually of pretty good quality.  Any herbs (or spices for that matter) that I use, I almost always get from Starwest Botanicals because of the quality, the speedy shipping, the great variety of products, and the excellent customer service.  

Tools You Will Need:

Crockpot

Kitchen Scale

Wooden Spoons

Hand Blender 

Soap Mold

Sharp Knife

A Note About Safety

Using lye to create soap is potentially very dangerous.  Lye is caustic and can cause burns and blindness if any gets into your eyes.  ALWAYS use safety gear---eye glasses and rubber gloves.  I also wear long sleeves. 

If any lye or lye solution or caustic uncooked soap gets on your skin, apply vinegar right away.  The acid in the vinegar counteracts the alkalinity of the lye.

Also---it's important to stay with your soap while it's cooking.  I walked away once, and it had boiled over the top of the crock pot! NOT a fun clean up.  

Keep children and pets away from your soap making area.  The lye can really hurt them---even a little bead on the floor!

LOL!  I have to share this:  The very first time I decided to make "real" soap using lye, it took me about two months to gear up for it.  As my husband watched warily, I carefully followed all the steps.  I was dressed out like the guys on "Breaking Bad."  I think he thought I was completely cray cray!  lol

At any rate, I'm a little bit looser with the safety measures now, but I ALWAYS wear my basic gloves & eye glasses. 

How to Make Lavender Rosemary Vanilla Hot Process Soap:

1. I preheat my crock pot on low.  Add all the oils in together and allow them to completely melt.  I also add in my clay at this time.  You can see a little sprinkle of the pink clay on the side of the crock pot and a tiny dab of unmelted shea butter too.

NOTE about measuring the oils, lye, and water:  You MUST measure accurately.  I actually try to measure to the hundredth of an ounce.  You need a kitchen scale to do this!  I use an Ozeri that has never failed me.  

2. Mix up your Lye Solution. You need to use a heat-proof container.  I use a Pyrex glass 16 ounce measuring pitcher that is dedicated to soap making only.   IMPORTANT!  Always, always, always pour the lye beads into the water, NOT the other way around.  Mix it up well.  (If you pour water into lye, you could potentially cause a volcano, and this could seriously injure you and at the least, make a huge mess.)

**At this point, while the oils are still melting and lye solution is sitting (I let it sit outside because of the fumes), it's time to blend up your essential oils.  I also add the flowers at this time to the essential oils because I have found that letting the flowers sit in the EO's while the "cook" is going on makes the scent last even longer in the finished soap!  SET THE EO'S ASIDE....You won't use them until the very end! 

3.  After the oils are completely melted, gently pour your lye solution into the oil.  (One of the nice things about hot process soap making is you don't need to fuss about the temperatures of the oil or lye solution.)

4. Using a hand blender (I use one that is completely dedicated to making soap), mix until you reach "trace."  Trace is that point when the mixture resembles a slightly stiff pudding. 

Just poured the lye solution into the oils.  Getting ready to start the stir!

Just poured the lye solution into the oils.  Getting ready to start the stir!

This is mixed to trace.

This is mixed to trace.

5. Put the lid on your crock pot and let the mixture "cook."  You will eventually see the mixture bubbling, turning, and rising up in the crock pot.  Go ahead and stir it down well.  You may need to stir it down another time or two.

The "mashed potato" phase...not done yet!

The "mashed potato" phase...not done yet!

There are still opaque bits in this mix.  So it needs to cook a bit more.

There are still opaque bits in this mix.  So it needs to cook a bit more.

6.  Keep stirring as needed.  Note the bits of opaque mixture still in the crock pot?  You don't want ANY opacity in the soap at all.  It is still caustic at this point.  You are looking for it to turn completely transclucent.  Some compare it to petroleum jelly.

Translucency has been reached! LOL.  Notice my SOAP label on the wooden spoon?  I pretty much dedicate all my soap making tools to just soap, and I label them so nobody accidentally uses them for something else.  

Translucency has been reached! LOL.  Notice my SOAP label on the wooden spoon?  I pretty much dedicate all my soap making tools to just soap, and I label them so nobody accidentally uses them for something else.  

7.  Test your soap to be sure it's done and safe. There are two things to look for---feel and zap. Take a bit off your soap spoon.  If it's done, you should be able to roll it into a waxy little ball.  It will be soft, but you can form it.  Now, the ZAP test.  Just place the little ball on the tip of your tongue.  You shouldn't feel anything and just taste a bit of soap.  If you feel a "ZAP" (and you will KNOW if you do), then either it's not done or something is not quite right.  

Here's another quick tale:  

Once, I inadvertently forgot to add the Sweet Almond Oil---12 whole ounces of oil!  That darn mix wouldn't stir up right!  So I kept stirring and trying the ZAP test! For like two hours!  YIKES!  Lol!  I had a SORE tongue.  DON'T do this!  :-)  When I finally realized what had happened, I just wanted to kick myself!  lol  But I'll never make that mistake again! 

Here are the Lavender flowers which have been soaking in the EO blend for the past hour or so!  Getting ready to pour them in! 

Here are the Lavender flowers which have been soaking in the EO blend for the past hour or so!  Getting ready to pour them in! 

Here is the soap in the mold.  This mold is not quite large enough for the 3 lb recipe I use, so I just cut off the top while it's still a bit warm and make soap balls.  OR, we just use the ends ourselves, and leave the rest for friends!

Here is the soap in the mold.  This mold is not quite large enough for the 3 lb recipe I use, so I just cut off the top while it's still a bit warm and make soap balls.  OR, we just use the ends ourselves, and leave the rest for friends!

This article is included in these great blog hops! So hop on over to any one of these great hops and enjoy LOTS of homesteading, DIY, recipes, and simple life articles!  The Homesteader HopThe Homestead Blog HopOur Simple Homestead Hop, and The Homestead Blogger's Network!

My soap making "Bible."  I LOVE this book, and I've used it extensively.  It's worth buying this book, especially if you are beginner.  The author comprehensively covers every aspect of soap making you can think of in terms that are understandable.  

And if you want to read some great soap making articles and how-to's, visit www.NerdyFarmWife.com or www.OakHillHomestead.com.  Both of these ladies have super clear instructions on lots of different soap options.  

Let me know if you try making soap! I'd love to hear your experiences!

Hugs & Self-Reliance!

Heidi

P.S.  I hope you'll sign up for the HHH Newsletter and never miss a thing! :-)

 

Affiliate Disclosure:  There are links to products in this article, and I do make a very small commission on any items you purchase if you click through my links.  This will not cost you any extra, and I truly and wonderfully thank you so much for your support of my blogging habit! 

Disclaimer:  I'm not a medical professional, and I do not proclaim to cure, diagnose, prevent, or cure any health or emotional issue.  Please see a medical professional for concerns.  The advice in this article, elsewhere on my website, or in my shop is simply my own opinion based on years of study and experience and is for informational purposes only.  

COMMENTS:  

I'd LOVE some feedback on my soaps!  Please let me know what you think!

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