Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Make Whey for Lacto-Fermentation

How to Make Whey for Lacto-Fermentation

I have been wanting to write some articles about fermenting different foods because raw fermented foods are not only great for your health, they are an excellent choice for preserving foods.  Whey is an optional ingredient in the lacto-fermentation process, but it definitely helps to speed up the fermentation of vegetables and fruits.  So, I decided to first write an article about how to make whey!  

This is a little over two cups of whey, the amount from a large container of quality whole fat yogurt.

This is a little over two cups of whey, the amount from a large container of quality whole fat yogurt.

 

What Exactly is Whey?

Have you ever opened a carton of cottage cheese or yogurt and noticed the thin runny liquid on top?  That's whey!  Essentially, it is the liquid that remains after you strain the particular dairy product.  Acid whey is the type of whey used in the lacto-fermentation process, and it comes from more acidic types of dairy such as cottage cheese and yogurt.  However, for the purposes of lacto-fermentation, I suggest using the whey from yogurt because of all the additional probiotics in it!  

Whey is made up of proteins, lactose (hence lacto-fermentation), some vitamins and minerals too.  There may be a little fat, especially if you use whole milk yogurt.  Whey is very good for you! In fact, In some countries, especially Northern Europe countries, whey is actually included in many drinks and sold in stores as well.  

Note:  Since whey is still considered a dairy product, if you are lactose intolerant, you should probably avoid it, unless just a little dairy in ingredients doesn't bother you.  

How to Make Whey for Lacto-Fermentation

Ingredients and Tools for Making Whey:

1. Large carton of whole fat plain yogurt.  I like to get mine from Whole Foods or a Sprouts-type store because they generally have a larger selection of yogurts from grass fed healthy cows.  

2. A large bowl

3. A large strainer

4. Cheesecloth

5. Storage Jar

Directions for Making Whey:

1.  Get your tools set up.  Using your large bowl, place the strainer on top and line it with cheesecloth (several layers) OR one layer of paper towel (the paper towel will keep even more of the milk solids out and your whey will be clear and beautiful. 

Here is my basic set up for making whey:  large bowl or container, large strainer to hold all the yogurt, and a paper towel or layers of cheesecloth to strain.  In this picture and for the whey gathered for this article, I used paper towel.  

Here is my basic set up for making whey:  large bowl or container, large strainer to hold all the yogurt, and a paper towel or layers of cheesecloth to strain.  In this picture and for the whey gathered for this article, I used paper towel.  

2. Pour all the yogurt into the lined strainer.  Cover it with another layer of paper towel to keep little interested parties out, and place in a quiet, cool place for several hours.   The "drip" process can take a long time.  I usually leave mine overnight on the counter, and when I wake up....lovely whey! 

Here is the set up above with the yogurt sitting on the layer of paper towel.  The whey drip is just barely beginning.  It's a slow process.  Plan for several hours, even overnight!

Here is the set up above with the yogurt sitting on the layer of paper towel.  The whey drip is just barely beginning.  It's a slow process.  Plan for several hours, even overnight!

3.  Now just pour your whey into a clean jar and refrigerate.  This batch (and most of the batches I make using really good yogurt yields about 2 cups, give or take a little.  

Here is the yield the next morning!  About 2 wonderful cups.  

Here is the yield the next morning!  About 2 wonderful cups.  

That's it!!  Your whey is ready to use in any of your lacto-fermented recipes!  Most recipes call for about 1/4 cup of whey, or perhaps only a couple of tablespoons--not very much.  So, this whey will last awhile.  The general rule is 2 weeks in the refrigerator, however, I have used it after more time than that, and it's been just fine.  I go by the "smell" test.  If in doubt, though, throw it out---just to be safe.  

Do you use whey in your ferments to help get things going?  

Hugs & Self-Reliance!

Heidi

P.S. Don't forget to sign up for the HHH Newsletter!

NOTE: There are affiliate links in this article! This simply means that if you happen to click through on one and make any kind of purchase, I will receive a small commission at NO extra cost to you! I appreciate your support! Heidi

TOOLS:

I could NOT live without the set below.  I have one set dedicated to soap making, and I use another for my cooking and foods, including straining herbal tinctures and teas.  This is an affiliate link.  If you do happen to click on it and order something, I will receive a very small commission, and with this I hope to sustain my blog eventually.  It costs you nothing! :-) 

I have several of these sets of strainers.  

I'll be writing more articles about fermentation and how to use this whey very soon!  Let me know what you think?  Do you use anything else to get your ferments going? 

8 Natural Ways to Transform Tiredness Into Energy!

8 Natural Ways to Transform Tiredness Into Energy!

How to Make an Herbal Remedy for Insomnia

How to Make an Herbal Remedy for Insomnia

0