Hi! I'm Heidi.

 Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

 I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

How to Make Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut (Fermented. Delicious. Full of Probiotics.)

How to Make Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut (Fermented. Delicious. Full of Probiotics.)

Fermented foods. Raw fermented foods. The very word "fermented" may conjure up deliciousness---or rottenness, depending on your personal experiences. But when done right, there is simply very little better for you than a good batch of raw fermented vegetables, such as this Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut recipe I'm going to share with you. In fact, your body might be craving delicious fermented foods!

I see instances like this ALL the time:  One day my friend brought her teenage daughter by because she thought she might be interested in looking into herbalism and asked me to show her some things I do. 

While explaining what I did with all those mysterious bottles and jars of herbs, infused oils, and tinctures, I asked her if she'd like a little snack. I gave her a little bowl of homemade raw fermented cabbage---otherwise known as sauerkraut. Well, that little gal ended up eating the entire jar! Right there!

This is not the first time I've seen this happen to people experiencing raw fermented foods for the first time. To me it speaks to the human body's ability to know when a food is needed for its survival. It's almost a desperation. 

Fermentation is incredibly good for your micro-biome---otherwise known as your gut-health! 

You can find out more about what fermentation is and why you should eat fermented foods every day in this article. You can also find out more about some common myths and misconceptions about fermentation here. I hope to dispel any notions you may have that raw fermented foods are problematic or dangerous! 

Fermentation is simply a traditional method of preserving vegetables, fruits, dairy and even meat. So, enjoy this spicy twist on traditional purple sauerkraut made with red cabbage and carrots. You'll absolutely go bonkers for this fermented dish! 

FTC Disclosure: There are affiliate links scattered throughout this article. If you click through and make any kind of purchase, I may receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you---Heidi. (Full Disclosure Here)
 Want to find out how to make your own fermented cabbage (also known as sauerkraut)? My spicy carrot sauerkraut has all the health benefits PLUS because it's sauerkraut with a spicy, garlicky, carrot twist. This kraut is exceptionally delicious, and I know you'll love this recipe. Easy to follow directions to ferment your own spicy carrot kraut with a delicious twist!

Want to find out how to make your own fermented cabbage (also known as sauerkraut)? My spicy carrot sauerkraut has all the health benefits PLUS because it's sauerkraut with a spicy, garlicky, carrot twist. This kraut is exceptionally delicious, and I know you'll love this recipe. Easy to follow directions to ferment your own spicy carrot kraut with a delicious twist!

How to Make Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut: A Recipe

I love this stuff. I can eat sauerkraut every single day. In fact, I often eat it more than once a day! It's addicting. If you don't like a lot of spice, adjust accordingly for your tastes. The combination of crunchy carrots add a hint of a different texture, along with the sugars contained in the carrots. It's truly a delicious little snack!

Ingredients for Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut:

1 organic red cabbage

2 organic carrots, unpeeled, shredded

Dried red pepper (I used dried peppers from my garden, but you can use red pepper flakes too)

1 1/2 tablespoon garlic

2 tablespoons sea salt

Filtered water

Optional: 1/4 cup whey or leftover brine from a recent ferment or some fermented kvass. You can find out how to make whey in this article. And here is a great recipe for basic beet kvass

This is the starter, and will help speed up the fermentation process, if you like. Some people use a starter all the time, and others are not fans of this method. I usually try to add the starter. 

 Red cabbage & carrots.....

Red cabbage & carrots.....

 Garlic & spicy cayenne peppers from the garden too....

Garlic & spicy cayenne peppers from the garden too....

Directions for Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut:

Step 1) Remove the top layer of leaves from the cabbage. Compost these. Then remove one more set of leaves---this leaf(ves) will be used to cover the sauerkraut as it ferments later on, so just set it aside.

Step 2) Chop up the cabbage into smallish pieces or strips. 

Step 3) Shred the carrots. If they are organic, just clean them well, but if they are not, I'd peel them first. 

Step 4) Mince your garlic and cut up your peppers. Since my peppers were dried out, I just crumbled them up.

Step 5) Add everything to a large bowl, along with the salt.

 Pound that cabbage! The salt acts to release juices. The more you pound it, the better it will be. I use a  sauerkraut pounder  for this, but any blunt object will work. 

Pound that cabbage! The salt acts to release juices. The more you pound it, the better it will be. I use a sauerkraut pounder for this, but any blunt object will work. 

Step 6) Using a sauerkraut pounder of some type, pound that cabbage good. This releases the juices from the cabbage, reducing the amount of water you'll need to add and the potential problem of juices leaking out of the jar as the fermentation process takes place.

Step 7) Now press this mixture into a Mason jar (or possibly two). You want to really pack the vegetables into the jar well. 

Step 8) Pour in your starter (whey or brine from a previous ferment or kvass).  Remember, this step is optional. 

Step 9) Fill the remainder as needed with water until the cabbage is barely covered. 

 This is a leaf of cabbage tucked around the packed down cabbage/carrot mixture. The next step after this is to cover it with liquid. If the brine created from the salt and pounding isn't sufficient, just add some additional water. I had to add some here. Your starter (if using) should go in before the water, though, and will count toward the liquid.

This is a leaf of cabbage tucked around the packed down cabbage/carrot mixture. The next step after this is to cover it with liquid. If the brine created from the salt and pounding isn't sufficient, just add some additional water. I had to add some here. Your starter (if using) should go in before the water, though, and will count toward the liquid.

Step 10) Tuck the cabbage leaf you saved from step 1 around the sauerkraut and down the sides of the jar. Press down well. 

Step 11) Using some type of fermentation weight, be sure all the vegetable matter is submerged in the water, which is actually a brine because of the salt you added earlier. This liquid helps keep the good bacteria and yeast thriving while creating an inhospitable environment for the bad micro-organisms, like mold, etc. 

Step 12) Now put on your airlock if you are using one. If you choose not to or don't have one, then use a regular Mason jar lid and plan to "burp" your ferment daily as the gases will build up. The airlock allows the gases to release without allowing any air into the jar. Either way is just fine!

Step 13) Set your jar in a quiet place to ferment for several days or even weeks. The longer you allow your sauerkraut to ferment, the more flavorful it will become! You can do taste tests after about a week, and when you like the way it is, just put it in the fridge! I left mine for about three weeks.....delicious!

Step 14) Once your sauerkraut is done, ENJOY! :-) 

 Isn't the final sauerkraut SO lovely?

Isn't the final sauerkraut SO lovely?

Final Thoughts on Spicy Carrot Sauerkraut

OMGosh! I love this stuff! So does Mr. V. And anyone else who tastes it! You can eat it straight out of the jar, or you can use it as a delicious side dish. It's also great in salads or cold pasta dishes. You can cook with it if you like, but keep in mind that intense heat will kill the good probiotics, so go easy. I love eating it with scrambled eggs!

Sauerkraut is one of the easiest gateways to learning how to ferment even more vegetables and give your body a great health boost. This spicy twist on an old favorite is one I'll be making again and again, and I hope you will too!

What is your favorite fermented food? Are you a person who is still a bit hesitant about trying to create your own fermented foods? If you have questions, please leave them in the comments! And as always, anything you want to say is welcome too! :-) 

Hugs, Self-Reliance, & Natural Health,

Heidi

P.S. I hope you'll sign up for our newsletter if you haven't done so yet! You'll never miss a thing, plus I'm proud to send you three eBooks as gifts. One is on using essential oils, another is about how to use herbs to de-stress and relax, and finally one is about how to go about getting your own homestead started, no matter where you live! Enjoy! 

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