Hi! I'm Heidi.

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

Hi! I'm Heidi, and here is my Homestead Journey.....

 

Hi! I'm Heidi--I'm a modern-day homesteader starting out in middle age! I'm all about plant medicine, raising animals for love & food, preparedness, traditional food practices, and being a natural health rebel for life! Join me on this journey!

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

I'm Heidi, and this is Ranger.  He has been with me for over ten years, and I love him dearly.  

Make Your Own Fermented Hot Sauce with Dried Peppers

Make Your Own Fermented Hot Sauce with Dried Peppers

I am REALLY missing our Summer and Fall harvest of peppers and other fresh vegetables to can, dehydrate, and ferment.  While in the grocery store recently, my eyes fell upon a very large bag of dried hot peppers:  Chiles de Arbol, to be exact.  Chile de Arbol are bright red peppers that can be substituted for Cayenne or Pequin peppers, as they have a similar heat unit rating.  In other words....They are HOT!  Might these work for fermented hot sauce? I was inspired to try fermenting these lovely bright red peppers! After all, we just ran out of our supply of fermented hot sauce from our fresh peppers in the garden last summer.  Here are the results of and the recipe for my latest fermentation experiment! YUM! They are awesome! 

Find out how to make the BEST fermented Chile de Arbol hot sauce!  It's easy, inexpensive, and good for your body, being filled with healthy probiotics!   Yum!

Find out how to make the BEST fermented Chile de Arbol hot sauce!  It's easy, inexpensive, and good for your body, being filled with healthy probiotics!   Yum!

Ingredients for Fermented Chile de Arbol Hot Sauce

1. 8 oz bag of dried Chile de Arbol (These peppers can be found in most grocery stores these days, but you can use the link if you can't find them.  This link is for a bag twice as large as the one I used, so you could just cut it in half or even fourths, if you wanted!)

2. filtered water

3. raw apple cider vinegar

4. sea salt

5. garlic (optional)

6. brine from other ferments OR whey  See how to make your own whey here.  (Adding one of these is optional but it will help speed up the fermentation process by adding probiotic yeast/bacteria right away.  Your peppers will still ferment without adding one of these, but it will be much slower with a slightly greater chance of mold forming.)  

Even though I prefer to use my own garden-grown dehydrated or fresh peppers for fermentation, I was very impressed with the quality of these peppers!  PLUS, they are very inexpensive!

Even though I prefer to use my own garden-grown dehydrated or fresh peppers for fermentation, I was very impressed with the quality of these peppers!  PLUS, they are very inexpensive!

Here is the empty bag of Chile de Arbol---dried hot peppers.  Although it's only 8 ounces, it is actually quite a large bag because the dried peppers are so light. 

Here is the empty bag of Chile de Arbol---dried hot peppers.  Although it's only 8 ounces, it is actually quite a large bag because the dried peppers are so light. 

How to Make Fermented Hot Sauce with Chile de Arbol Peppers

Step 1)

Pour your peppers into a gallon size jar, or in my case, I used two half-gallon jars.  This will give the peppers some room to dehydrate---they will expand some!

I used TWO of these half-gallon jars for the one 8 ounce bag of dried peppers.

I used TWO of these half-gallon jars for the one 8 ounce bag of dried peppers.

Step 2:

Fill the jars to within 2 inches of the top with filtered water.  We are on a well, so I just use our water straight from the well with no issues.  If you have city water, you need to be sure there is no chlorine in the water, as it will affect the fermentation process.  If you leave it out overnight, the chlorine will evaporate.

Step 3:

Add about 1 1/2 tablespoons of sea salt to each jar.  Put a lid on and shake until the salt is dissolved.  It doesn't take much shaking.  Add your garlic if you like! 

I just added the salt in this picture----

I just added the salt in this picture----

Step 4:

If you have any brine left over from other ferments or whey handy (see how to make your own whey here), then add about a quarter cup now.  

Step 5: 

Weigh down the peppers using some kind of weight.  You can buy fermenting weights, but with this wide-mouth jar, I just used a little jelly jar with a boiled rock placed inside.  Some of the peppers and seeds were still at the surface, but I just decided to keep a close eye on the ferment.

The jelly jar and boiled rock being used as a weight to keep the peppers under the liquid as much as possible...

The jelly jar and boiled rock being used as a weight to keep the peppers under the liquid as much as possible...

Step 6:

Let sit on your counter top or window sill for about a week or two.  I let this ferment go two weeks, and it was perfect!  If you use a regular lid like I did, you will have to "burp" it by opening the lid just slightly once or twice a day to allow the gases from the fermentation process out.

Watch it carefully, and if you see mold forming, just scrape off the affected parts.  You are not likely to see mold though.  I've only had that happen once, and it was tomatoes that had a large surface area above the surface of the liquid---Shame on me!  

You can taste test the liquid over time if you want.  I actually began scooping some out with a clean spoon while cooking about a week after the fermenting started!  

When you are happy with the taste (and you'll know), then it's time to make the hot sauce! 

Step 7:

Drain out about half of the liquid from each jar.  Pour your peppers and liquid into a good blender like a VitaMix or a Nutribullet.  I have both, and for this I just used the NutriBullet because it is always on my counter.  The VitaMix probably would have been easier, though, because I could have fit all the peppers and liquid in at once.  

Add some vinegar.  I ended up adding about a half bottle (1/2 liter) of raw apple cider vinegar all told, into the two half-gallons (minus about half of the original liquid).   Blend well! Pour into bottles for storage and/or use!

Here is the total yield:  one completely full half-gallon Mason jar, and a smaller decorative bottle with a pour spout that can sit attractively on the counter or table! Just keep the half-gallon in the fridge and refill your smaller bottle as needed!

Here is the total yield:  one completely full half-gallon Mason jar, and a smaller decorative bottle with a pour spout that can sit attractively on the counter or table! Just keep the half-gallon in the fridge and refill your smaller bottle as needed!

The Total Cost for a Bit Over a Half-Gallon of Hot Sauce that's Just as Good (Better, IMHO) than Tabasco!

LOVE this part!  The total cost to make this huge amount of delicious homemade hot sauce with probiotics for health was about $6.50.  The bag of Chile de Arbol cost $5.99 at the grocery store, but you can probably buy them for less on Amazon.  The raw ACV came from Costco, and was about $3.00 a bottle, so for half a bottle, that's just $1.50.  Meanwhile, Tabasco sauce costs a whopping $8.00 for a large jar, which is actually just a fraction of the amount I just made!  Amazing! 

Do you ferment your vegetables, peppers, or fruits?  I'd love to know! 

Hugs and Self-Reliance!

Heidi

P.S.  If you enjoyed this article, I'd love it if you signed up for our newsletter and never miss a thing!  When you do--I'll send you a copy of my eBooks, "How to Relax with Herbs!" and "12 Best Essential Oil Diffuser Blends"

 

This article contains affiliate links, and this simply means if you click through one and make a purchase of any type, I will receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you!  I appreciate your support of Healing Harvest Homestead! Thank you, Heidi

This article has been shared on these link parties:  The Homestead Blog Hop, Homesteader Hop, Grandma's DIY, Our Simple Blog Hop, and the Homestead Bloggers Network.  See ya there!

The above fermentation kit is a great way to get started with fermentation if you are new and need weights and accessories! 

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